Journal article

Significance of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies in systemic sclerosis

Jayne Moxey, Molla Huq, Susanna Proudman, Joanne Sahhar, Gene-Siew Ngian, Jenny Walker, Gemma Strickland, Michelle Wilson, Laura Ross, Gabor Major, Janet Roddy, Wendy Stevens, Mandana Nikpour

ARTHRITIS RESEARCH & THERAPY | BMC | Published : 2019

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Up to 12% of patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc) have anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA). However, the majority of these patients do not manifest ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) and the significance of ANCA in these patients is unclear. The aim of this study is to determine the prevalence of ANCA in a well-characterised SSc cohort and to examine the association between ANCA and SSc clinical characteristics, other autoantibodies, treatments and mortality. METHODS: Clinical data were obtained from 5 centres in the Australian Scleroderma Cohort Study (ASCS). ANCA positive was defined as the presence of any one or combination of cytoplasmic ANCA (c-ANCA), perinuclear A..

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Grants

Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia Career Development Fellowship


Funding Acknowledgements

The Australian Scleroderma Cohort Study (ASCS) is supported by Actelion Australia, Scleroderma Australia, Scleroderma Victoria, Arthritis Australia, Musculoskeletal Australia, The Scleroderma Clinical Trials Consortium, St Vincent's Hospital Research Endowment Fund, The Australian Rheumatology Association, GlaxoSmithKline, Roche, Pfizer, Bayer, CSL Biotherapies and Bristol-Myers Squibb. MN holds a National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia Career Development Fellowship (APP 1126370). LR holds a Musculoskeletal Australia PhD Scholarship and an Australian Government Research Training Program Scholarship.