Journal article

Validating the Hornik & Woolf approach to choosing media campaign themes: Do promising beliefs predict behavior change in a longitudinal study?

Robert C Hornik, Allyson C Volinsky, Shane Mannis, Laura A Gibson, Emily Brennan, Stella J Lee, Andy SL Tan

COMMUNICATION METHODS AND MEASURES | ROUTLEDGE JOURNALS, TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD | Published : 2019

Abstract

Hornik and Woolf (1999) proposed using cross-sectional survey data to prioritize beliefs to address with communication campaign messages. The empirical component of the approach combines evidence of (1) association of beliefs with intentions and (2) current level of beliefs to calculate a 'percentage to gain' as the potential promise of a belief. However, the method relies on cross-sectional data; its conclusions are open to challenge. Here, a panel study assesses whether the calculated promise of a belief actually predicts future behavior change. A nationally representative sample of 3,204 U.S. youth and young adults were interviewed twice, six months apart. Sixteen beliefs about the benefi..

View full abstract

Grants

Awarded by Food and Drug Administration Center for Tobacco Products


Awarded by National Institutes of Health


Awarded by NATIONAL CANCER INSTITUTE


Funding Acknowledgements

This work was supported by the Food and Drug Administration Center for Tobacco Products [P50CA179546] and National Institutes of Health [P50CA179546].