Journal article

A Randomized Controlled Trial of Adherence to a 24-Month Home-Based Physical Activity Program and the Health Benefits for Older Adults at Risk of Alzheimer's Disease: The AIBL Active-Study

Kay L Cox, Elizabeth Cyarto, Kathryn A Ellis, David Ames, Patricia Desmond, Pramit Phal, Matthew J Sharman, Cassandra Szoeke, Christopher C Rowe, Colin L Masters, Emily You, Sally Burrows, Michelle MY Lai, Nicola T Lautenschlager

Journal of Alzheimer's Disease | IOS PRESS | Published : 2019

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Previous studies have demonstrated that physical activity (PA) interventions can improve physical and cognitive outcomes in older adults, but most have been relatively short in duration (<1 year) with a few having specifically targeting individuals at risk of developing Alzheimer's disease. OBJECTIVE: To examine adherence and physical health outcomes in a 24-month home-based PA intervention in older adults at risk of Alzheimer's disease. METHODS: Participants 60 years and older with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or subjective memory complaints (SMC) with at least 1 cerebrovascular risk factor recruited from The Australian Imaging Biomarkers and Lifestyle Flagship Study of Aging..

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Grants

Awarded by Australian National Health and Medical Research Council


Awarded by Centre of Research Excellence in Cognitive Health from the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council


Awarded by NHMRC


Funding Acknowledgements

This paper was supported by a project grant (1005942) and the Centre of Research Excellence in Cognitive Health (1100579) from the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council.Funding for the AIBL study is provided by the CSIRO Flagship Collaboration Fund and the Science and Industry Endowment Fund (SIEF) in partnership with Edith Cowan University (ECU), Mental Health Research institute (MHRI), Alzheimer's Australia (AA), National Ageing Research Institute (NARI), Austin Health, CogState Ltd., Hollywood Private Hospital, Sir Charles Gardner Hospital. The study also receives funding from the National Health and Medical Research Council, the Dementia Collaborative Research Centers program (DCRC2) and The McCusker Alzheimer's Research Foundation and Operational Infrastructure Support from the Government of Victoria. The Australian Postgraduate Award supported the stipend for ML to be involved in this project.CS is supported by the NHMRC (grant numbers: 547600, 1032350, and 1062133).