Journal article

Orthographic Learning in Children Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing

Malin Wass, Teresa YC Ching, Linda Cupples, Hua-Chen Wang, Bjorn Lyxell, Louise Martin, Laura Button, Miriam Gunnourie, Isabelle Boisvert, Catherine McMahon, Anne Castles

LANGUAGE SPEECH AND HEARING SERVICES IN SCHOOLS | AMER SPEECH-LANGUAGE-HEARING ASSOC | Published : 2019

Abstract

Purpose The purpose of the current study was to investigate the relationship between orthographic learning and language, reading, and cognitive skills in 9-year-old children who are deaf or hard of hearing (DHH) and to compare their performance to age-matched typically hearing (TH) controls. Method Eighteen children diagnosed with moderate-to-profound hearing loss who use hearing aids and/or cochlear implants participated. Their performance was compared with 35 age-matched controls with typical hearing. Orthographic learning was evaluated using a spelling task and a recognition task. The children were assessed on measures of reading ability, language, working memory, and paired-associate lea..

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Grants

Awarded by National Institute on Deafness and Communication Disorders Award


Awarded by NATIONAL INSTITUTE ON DEAFNESS AND OTHER COMMUNICATION DISORDERS


Funding Acknowledgements

This project was funded by the Swedish Research Agency for Health, Working Life and Welfare, and the European Commission through a COFAS Marie Curie Fellowship to the first author. The work was carried out as part of the Longitudinal Outcomes of Children with Hearing Impairment study, supported by the National Institute on Deafness and Communication Disorders Award No. R01DC008080. The project was also partly supported by the Commonwealth of Australia through the Office of Hearing Services. We acknowledge the financial support of the HEARing Cooperative Research Centre, established and supported under the Cooperative Research Centres Program of the Australian Government. We are grateful to the pupils, parents, and teachers of the schools that participated in the project. We also thank the researchers and staff at the Department of Cognitive Science and the Centre of Excellence in Cognition and its Disorders, Macquarie University, and the National Acoustic Laboratories for their advice and support during the data collection phase of the project.