Journal article

Human extravillous trophoblast invasion: intrinsic and extrinsic regulation

E Menkhorst, A Winship, M Van Sinderen, E Dimitriadis

REPRODUCTION FERTILITY AND DEVELOPMENT | CSIRO PUBLISHING | Published : 2016

Abstract

During the establishment of pregnancy, a human blastocyst implants into the uterine endometrium to facilitate the formation of a functional placenta. Implantation involves the blastocyst adhering to the uterine luminal epithelium before the primitive syncytiotrophoblast and subsequently specialised cells, the extravillous trophoblast (EVT), invade into the decidua in order to engraft and remodel uterine spiral arteries, creating the placental blood supply at the end of the first trimester. Defects in EVT invasion lead to abnormal placentation and thus adverse pregnancy outcomes. The local decidual environment is thought to play a key role in regulating trophoblast invasion. Here we describe ..

View full abstract

Grants

Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia (NHMRC) Senior Research Fellowship


Awarded by NHMRC Early Career Fellowship


Funding Acknowledgements

The authors' work reported herein was supported by the Victorian Government's Operational Infrastructure Support Program. ED was supported by a National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia (NHMRC) Senior Research Fellowship (#550905). EM was supported by an NHMRC Early Career Fellowship (#611827). AW was supported by an Australian Postgraduate Award.