Journal article

Transancestral GWAS of alcohol dependence reveals common genetic underpinnings with psychiatric disorders

Raymond K Walters, Renato Polimanti, Emma C Johnson, Jeanette N McClintick, Mark J Adams, Amy E Adkins, Fazil Aliev, Silviu-Alin Bacanu, Anthony Batzler, Sarah Bertelsen, Joanna M Biernacka, Tim B Bigdeli, Li-Shiun Chen, Toni-Kim Clarke, Yi-Ling Chou, Franziska Degenhardt, Anna R Docherty, Alexis C Edwards, Pierre Fontanillas, Jerome C Foo Show all

Nature Neuroscience | NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP | Published : 2018

Grants

Awarded by National Institute of Mental Health


Awarded by Academy of Finland


Awarded by National Institutes of Health (NIH)


Awarded by National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA)


Awarded by German Government BMBF


Awarded by NHMRC


Awarded by Health Research Council of New Zealand


Awarded by NIH/NIAAA


Awarded by CSAT/SAMHSA


Awarded by AHRQ


Awarded by NSF GRFP


Awarded by BMBF


Awarded by Integrated Network IntegraMent


Awarded by SysMedAlcoholism


Awarded by Wellcome Trust


Awarded by National Institute on Drug Abuse


Awarded by US NIH


Awarded by National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)


Awarded by NIH from the NIAAA


Awarded by NIH GEI


Awarded by NIH Genes, Environment and Health Initiative (GEI)


Awarded by COGA


Awarded by Collaborative Genetic Study of Nicotine Dependence (COGEND)


Awarded by Family Study of Cocaine Dependence


Awarded by German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF)


Awarded by Virginia Commonwealth University from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism


Awarded by National Center for Research Resources


Awarded by Mayo CTSA


Awarded by Virginia Tobacco Settlement Foundation


Awarded by Swedish Research Council


Awarded by GenomEUtwin


Awarded by Heart and Lung Foundation


Awarded by Australian National Health and Medical Research Council


Awarded by Australian Research Council


Awarded by 5th Framework Programme (FP-5) GenomEUtwin Project


Awarded by Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium 2 grant


Awarded by MagW/ZonMW


Awarded by Geestkracht program of the Netherlands Organization for Health Research and Development


Awarded by Genetic determinants of risk behavior in relation to alcohol use and alcohol use disorder


Awarded by Biobanking and Biomolecular Resources Research Infrastructure (BBMRI-NL)


Awarded by European Science Council


Awarded by NWO/SPI


Awarded by Rutgers University Cell and DNA Repository


Awarded by European Community's Seventh Framework Programme ENGAGE Consortium


Awarded by Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development


Awarded by Wellcome


Awarded by Chief Scientist Office of the Scottish Government Health Directorates


Awarded by Scottish Funding Council


Awarded by Wellcome Trust (Wellcome Trust Strategic Award 'STratifying Resilience and Depression Longitudinally' (STRADL)



Funding Acknowledgements

We thank A. Morris for providing code implementing the MANTRA Bayesian model. We thank A. Martin, A. Bloemendal, and H. Finucane for helpful conversations about the analysis protocol for admixed cohorts. We thank D. Hughes for her assistance with editorial contributions to the manuscript. We thank R. Spanagel for significant contributions as a founding member of the German Study of the Genetics of Alcoholism (GESGA). The PGC-SUD Working Group receives support from the National Institute on Drug Abuse and the National Institute of Mental Health via MH109532. We gratefully acknowledge prior support from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. Statistical analyses for the PGC were carried out on the Genetic Cluster Computer (http://www.geneticcluster.org) hosted by SURFsara and financially supported by the 480-05-003), along with a supplement from the Dutch Brain Foundation and the VU University Amsterdam. We thank the 23 and Me research participants and employees for making this work possible. A.P. is supported by the Academy of Finland, Juselius Foundation; D.E.A. acknowledges 1K01MH093731; R. R. acknowledges AA-12502, AA-09203, AA-00145; M.K. is supported by AA009367, DA005147; M.M. is supported by AA009367, MH066140; R.A.G. is supported by AA017444; K.R. is supported by Academy of Finland; A.C.H. is supported by NIH AA07535, AA07729, AA13320, AA13321, and AA11998; A. R. D. is supported by NIH 1K01MH109765-01; A.E.A. is supported by NIH AA011408 and AA017828; A.G.W. is supported by NIH 3T32AA7464-38 S1; B.M.N. is supported by NIH U01 MH109539 and R01 MH107649; B.P.R. is supported by NIH AA011408, AA017828, and AA022537; B.S.M. is supported by NIH R01DA036525 and R01DA039408; B.T.W. is supported by NIH AA011408, AA017828, and AA022537; C. Hodgkinson. is supported by NIH and National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) Intramural program; C.J.H. is supported by NIH DA032555, DA035804, DA011015, and DA042755; D.-S.C. is supported by NIH P20AA017830 and AA018779; W.I. is supported by NIH DA005147, DA013240, DA024417, and DA036216; S.A.B. is supported by NIH DA021905; H.d.W. is supported by NIH DA02812; M.C.S. is supported by NIH DA035804; S.V. is supported by NIH DA042755, DA037904, DA040177, and HG008983; R.P. is supported by NIH DA12690; J.G. is supported by NIH DA12690; D.B.H. is supported by NIH R01DA036583; D.G. is supported by the NIAAA Intramural program; D.M.D. is supported by NIH R01AA015416, K02AA018755, U10AA008401, and P50AA0022537; E.J.C. is supported by NIH DA023026, DA011301, and DA024413; E.O.J. is supported by NIH R01 DA044014; N.S. is supported by German Government BMBF #01EB0130; K.M. is supported by German Government BMBF #01EB0410; G.W.M. is supported by an NHMRC fellowship by GNT1078399; N.W. is supported by D.F.G. and B.M.B.F.; N. Dahmen is supported by D.F.G. and B.M.B.F.; J.D.B. is supported by NIH R01HD060726; M.A.K. is supported by Health Research Council of New Zealand 11/792, 16/600; J.M. Boden is supported by Health Research Council of New Zealand 11/792, 16/600; J. H. is supported by Health Research Council of New Zealand 11/792, 16/600; J.F.P. is supported by Health Research Council of New Zealand 11/792, 16/600; H.H.M. is supported by NIH DA025109, DA024413, and DA016977; J.E.S. is supported by NIH K01 AA024152; J.A.K. is supported by Academy of Finland 265240, 263278, and Sigrid Juselius Foundation; J.K.H. is supported by NIH DA011015; J.L.M. is supported by NIH K01DA037914; J.M. Biernaka is supported by NIH P20AA017830 and AA25214; K.K. is supported by NIH DA011015; K.S.K.is supported by NIH P50AA0022537; L.-S.C. is supported by NIH DA038076; L.J.B. is supported by NIH R01DA036583; L.M.H. is supported by NIH AA011408 and AA017828; L.D. is supported by an Australian NHMRC Principal Research Fellowship; M.A.F. is supported by NIH/NIAAA P20AA017830; M.D.R. is supported by CSAT/SAMHSA 1H79T1026423, 1H79T1026446, AHRQ 1R18HS024208, and NIH R01DA036628; N.A.G. is supported by NIH R00DA023549; P.-H.S. is supported by NIAAA Intramural Research Program; N. Diazgranados is supported by NIAAA Intramural Research Program; M. Schwandt is supported by NIAAA Intramural Research Program; R. W. is supported by NSF GRFP DGE 1144083; P.A.F.M. is supported by NIH DA012854 and R25DA027995; J. M. is supported by Peter Boris Chair in Addictions Research; K. M. H is supported by NIH R01 HD060726, R01 HD073342, and P01 HD031921; M. B. M. is supported by NIH R01HD060726; R. K. W. is supported by NIH U01 MH094432; R. C. C. is supported by NIH R01DA036583; R.E.P. is supported by NIH K01MH113848; R.E.T. is supported by NIH R21DA043735; S.S.-R. is supported by the Frontiers of Innovation Scholars Program (FISP) and the Interdisciplinary Research Fellowship in NeuroAIDS (IRFN) and by NIH P50DA037844; S.-A. B. is supported by NIH AA011408, AA017828, AA022537, and AA022717; S.E.M. is supported by NHMRC 1103623; S.M.H. is supported by NIH R21AA024888 and K08DA032680; T.B.B. is supported by NIH MH100549; M. M. N. is supported by The BMBF-funded e: Med consortium IntegraMent 01ZX1314A, SysMedAlcoholism 01ZX1311A, and DFG-funded Excellence-Cluster ImmunoSensation; S. C. is supported by The Integrated Network IntegraMent 01ZX1314A; M. Rietschel is supported by The Integrated Network IntegraMent 01ZX1314G and SysMedAlcoholism 01ZX1311A; T. L. W. is supported by NIH R01 DA021905 and R01 DA035804; A. M. G. is supported by NIH U10 AA08401; M. L.-P. is supported by University of Helsinki, Academy of Finland; J. L. is supported by University of Helsinki, Academy of Finland; V. M. K. is supported by NIH P20AA017830 and AA25214; W. E. C. is supported by NIH R01HD093651, R01DA036523, and P30DA023026; T.-K. C. is supported by Wellcome Trust (STRADL) 104036/Z/14/Z; M. J. A. is supported by Wellcome Trust (STRADL) 104036/Z/14/Z; A. M. M. is supported by Wellcome Trust (STRADL) 104036/Z/14/Z. A. A. is supported by NIH K02DA32573. Funding support for the Comorbidity and Trauma Study (dbGAP accession number: phs000277.v1.p1) was provided by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (R01 DA17305); GWAS genotyping services at the CIDR at The Johns Hopkins University were supported by the National Institutes of Health (contract N01-HG-65403). Funding support for the Center for Education and Drug Abuse Research (dbGAP accession number: phs001649.v1.p1) was provided by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (P50 DA005605). The Christchurch Health and Development Study (dbGAP in progress) has been supported by funding from the Health Research Council of New Zealand, the National Child Health Research Foundation (Cure Kids), the Canterbury Medical Research Foundation, the New Zealand Lottery Grants Board, the University of Otago, the Carney Centre for Pharmacogenomics, the James Hume Bequest Fund, US NIH grant MH077874, and NIDA grant "A developmental model of gene-environment interplay in SUDs" (R01DA024413) 2007-2012. COGA is supported by NIH Grant U10AA008401 from the NIAAA and the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA).Funding support for this GWAS genotyping, which was performed at the Johns Hopkins University Center for Inherited Disease Research, was provided by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, the NIH GEI (U01HG004438) and the NIH contract " High throughput genotyping for studying the genetic contributions to human disease" (HHSN268200782096C). COGA Principal Investigators: B. Porjesz, V. Hesselbrock, H. Edenberg, L. Bierut; includes eleven different centers: University of Connecticut (V. Hesselbrock); Indiana University (H. J. Edenberg, J. Nurnberger Jr., T. Foroud); University of Iowa (S. Kuperman, J. Kramer); SUNY Downstate (B. Porjesz); Washington University in St. Louis (L. Bierut, J. Rice, K. Bucholz, A. Agrawal); University of California at San Diego (M. Schuckit); Rutgers University (J. Tischfield, A. Brooks); Department of Biomedical and Health Informatics, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia; Department of Genetics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia PA (L. Almasy), Virginia Commonwealth University (D. Dick), Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai (A. Goate), and Howard University (R. Taylor). Other COGA collaborators include: L. Bauer (University of Connecticut); J. McClintick, L. Wetherill, X. Xuei, Y. Liu, D. Lai, S. O'Connor, M. Plawecki, S. Lourens (Indiana University); G. Chan (University of Iowa; University of Connecticut); J. Meyers, D. Chorlian, C. Kamarajan, A. Pandey, J. Zhang (SUNY Downstate); J.-C. Wang, M. Kapoor, S. Bertelsen (Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai); A. Anokhin, V. McCutcheon, S. Saccone (Washington University); J. Salvatore, F. Aliev, B. Cho (Virginia Commonwealth University); and Mark Kos (University of Texas Rio Grande Valley). A. Parsian is an NIAAA Staff Collaborator. M. Reilly was an NIAAA staff collaborator. We continue to be inspired by our memories of Henri Begleiter and Theodore Reich, founding PI and Co-PI of COGA, and also owe a debt of gratitude to other past organizers of COGA, including T. -K. Li, currently a consultant with COGA, as well as P. M. Conneally, R. Crowe, and W. Reich, for their critical contributions. The authors thank K. Doheny and E. Pugh from CIDR and J. Paschall from the NCBI dbGaP staff for valuable assistance with genotyping and quality control in developing the dataset available at dbGaP (phs000125.v1.p1, phs000763.v1.p1, and phs000976.v1.p1). Support for the Study of Addiction: Genetics and Environment (SAGE) was provided through the NIH Genes, Environment and Health Initiative (GEI; U01 HG004422; dbGaP study accession phs000092.v1.p1). SAGE is one of the GWAS funded as part of the Gene Environment Association Studies (GENEVA) under GEI. Assistance with phenotype harmonization and genotype cleaning, as well as with general study coordination, was provided by the GENEVA Coordinating Center (U01 HG004446). Assistance with data cleaning was provided by the National Center for Biotechnology Information. Support for collection of datasets and samples was provided by COGA (U10 AA008401), the Collaborative Genetic Study of Nicotine Dependence (COGEND; P01 CA089392; see also phs000404.v1.p1), and the Family Study of Cocaine Dependence (R01 DA013423, R01 DA019963).Funding support for genotyping, which was performed at the Johns Hopkins University Center for Inherited Disease Research (CIDR), was provided by the NIH GEI (U01HG004438), the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, the National Institute on Drug Abuse, and the NIH contract "High throughput genotyping for studying the genetic contributions to human disease" (HHSN268200782096C). For GESGA, M. R. and M. M. N. were supported by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) through grants BMBF 01ZX1311A (to M. R. and M. M. N.), and through grants 01ZX1314A (to M. M. N.) and 01ZX1314G (to M. R.) within the e:Med research program. The GSMS project (phs000852. v1. p1) was supported by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (U01DA024413 and R01DA11301), the National Institute of Mental Health (R01MH063970, R01MH063671, R01MH048085, K01MH093731, and K23MH080230), NARSAD, and the William T. Grant Foundation. We are grateful to all the GSMS and CCC study participants who contributed to this work. The following grants supported data collection and analysis of the Center on Antisocial Drug Dependence (CADD; dbGAP in progress): DA011015, DA012845, DA021913, DA021905, DA032555, and DA035804. Funding support for Spit for Science (dbGAP in progress) has been provided by Virginia Commonwealth University, P20 AA017828, R37AA011408, K02AA018755, and P50 AA022537 from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, and UL1RR031990 from the National Center for Research Resources and National Institutes of Health Roadmap for Medical Research. We would like to thank the Spit for Science participants for making this study a success, as well as the many University faculty, students, and staff who contributed to the design and implementation of the project. In particular we acknowledge the contributions of the many individuals who have played a critical role data collection, generation, and cleaning, including A. Adkins, F. Aliev, E. Caraway, S. B. Cho, J. Clifford, M. Cooke, E. Do, A. Edwards, N. Goyal, L. Halberstadt, S. Hawn, R. Holloway, J. Lent, M. Lind, E. Long, J. Meyers, J. Myers, A. Moore, A. Moscati, Z. Neale, J. Opalesky, C. Overstreet, K. Pedersen, L. Rappa, B. Riley, J. Salvatore, J. Savage, C. Sun, N. Thomas, B. Webb, and J. Yan. The NIAAA data (https://btris.nih.gov/) were supported by the NIAAA Intramural Research Program (IRP). Data collection, genotyping, and analysis of the Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Treatment of Addiction (CITA) data was supported by grants from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (P20 AA017830, and R21 AA25214), as well as the Mayo CTSA Grant Number UL1TR000135 and SC Johnson Genomics of Addiction Program. The Mayo Clinic Biobank, which served as the source of controls for the CITA cases, was supported by Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine. Alcohol Dependence in African Americans was funded by NIH grant R01 AA017444. Brisbane Longitudinal Twin Study was supported by the United States National Institute on Drug Abuse (R00DA023549) and by the Australian Research Council (DP0343921, DP0664638, 464914, 619667, and FT110100548). Gene-Environment-Development Initiative (GEDI) -Virginia Commonwealth University (VTSABD; dbGAP in progress) was supported by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (U01DA024413 and R01DA025109), the National Institute of Mental Health (R01MH045268, R01MH055557, and R01MH068521), and the Virginia Tobacco Settlement Foundation grant 8520012. We are grateful to all the VTSABD-YAFU-TSA study participants who contributed to this work.Minnesota Center for Twin and Family Research (phs000620. v1. p1) support contributing to this publication was supported by the National Institutes of Health under award numbers DA005147, DA013240, DA024417, DA036216, AA009367, and MH066140. Funding for TwinGene is a substudy of the Swedish Twin Registry, managed by Karolinska Institutet and supported by the Swedish Research Council under grant no 2017-00641. Additional funding was provided by the Swedish Research Council (M-2005-1112), GenomEUtwin (EU/QLRT-2001-01254 and QLG2-CT-2002-01254), National Institutes of Health U01-DK 066134, the Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research (SSF), and the Heart and Lung Foundation (20070481). Substance Use Disorder Liability: Candidate System Genes study was supported by R01 DA019157 and P50 DA005605. Yale-Penn (phs000425. v1. p1 and phs000952. v1. p1) was supported by National Institutes of Health Grants RC2 DA028909, R01 DA12690, R01 DA12849, R01 DA18432, R01 AA11330, and R01 AA017535 and by the Veterans Affairs Connecticut and Philadelphia Veterans Affairs Mental Illness Research, Educational, and Clinical Centers. Australian Alcohol and Nicotine studies (phs000181. v1. p1) were supported by National Institutes of Health Grants AA07535, AA07728, AA13320, AA13321, AA14041, AA11998, AA17688, DA012854, and DA019951; by grants from the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council (241944, 339462, 389927,389875, 389891, 389892, 389938, 442915, 442981, 496739, 552485, and 552498); by grants from the Australian Research Council(A7960034, A79906588, A79801419, DP0770096, DP0212016, and DP0343921); and by the 5th Framework Programme (FP-5) GenomEUtwin Project (QLG2-CT-2002-01254). GWAS genotyping at Center for Inherited Disease Research was supported by a grant to the late Richard Todd, former Principal Investigator of grant AA13320. Irish Affected Sib-Pair Study of Alcohol Dependence GWAS data collection and analysis was supported by National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism grants P20-AA-017828 and P50-AA-022537. Sample collection was supported by R01-AA-011408. Control genotyping was supported by National Institute of Mental Health grant R01-MH-083094 and Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium 2 grant WTCCC-084710. Netherland Twin Register (NTR) and Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety funding was obtained from multiple grants from the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO) and MagW/ZonMW, including NWO-48015-001/674: Netherlands Twin Registry Repository: researching the interplay between genome and environment; Geestkracht program of the Netherlands Organization for Health Research and Development (Zon-MW 10-000-1002), Genetic determinants of risk behavior in relation to alcohol use and alcohol use disorder (ZonMWAddiction-31160008); Biobanking and Biomolecular Resources Research Infrastructure (BBMRI -NL, 184.021.007), Amsterdam Public Health research institute (APH) and Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam (NCA); and the European Science Council (ERC-230374 and ERC-284167). Part of the genotyping was funded by NWO/SPI 56-46414192; the Genetic Association Information Network (GAIN) of the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health, Rutgers University Cell and DNA Repository (NIMH U24 MH068457-06), the Avera Institute for Human Genetics, Sioux Falls, South Dakota (USA), and the National Institutes of Health (NIH R01 HD042157-01A1, MH081802, and Grand Opportunity grants 1RC2 MH089951 and 1RC2 MH089995).The Finnish Twin Cohort/Nicotine Addiction Genetics-Finland study was supported by Academy of Finland (grants #213506 and 129680 to J. K.), NIH DA12854 (PAFM), Global Research Award for Nicotine Dependence/Pfizer Inc. (J. K.), Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, UK and the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme ENGAGE Consortium (HEALTH-F4-2007-201413). In Finntwin12, support for data collection and genotyping has come from National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (grants AA-12502, AA-00145, and AA-09203 to R. J. R. and AA15416 and K02AA018755 to D. M. D.), the Academy of Finland (grants 100499, 205585, 118555, 141054, and 264146 to J. K.), and Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, UK. This research uses data from Add Health, a program project directed by K. Mullan Harris and designed by J. R. Udry, P. S. Bearman, and K. Mullan Harris at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and funded by grant P01-HD31921 from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, with cooperative funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations. Information on how to obtain the Add Health data files is available on the Add Health website (http://www.cpc.unc.edu/addhealth).No direct support was received from grant P01-HD31921 for this analysis. The Helsinki Birth Cohort Study thanks all study participants as well as everybody involved in the Helsinki Birth Cohort Study. Helsinki Birth Cohort Study has been supported by grants from the Academy of Finland, the Finnish Diabetes Research Society, Folkhalsan Research Foundation, Novo Nordisk Foundation, Finska Lakaresallskapet, Juho Vainio Foundation, Signe and Ane Gyllenberg Foundation, University of Helsinki, Ministry of Education, Ahokas Foundation, and Emil Aaltonen Foundation. The Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) is extremely grateful to all the families who took part in the ALSPAC study, the midwives for their help in recruiting them, and the whole ALSPAC team, which includes interviewers, computer and laboratory technicians, clerical workers, research scientists, volunteers, managers, receptionists, and nurses. Funding/support was from The UK Medical Research Council and Wellcome (grant ref: 102215/2/13/2) and the University of Bristol provide core support for ALSPAC. This publication is the work of the authors and A. C. E. will serve as guarantor for the contents of this paper. A comprehensive list of grants funding is available on the ALSPAC website (http://www.bristol.ac.uk/alspac/external/documents/grant-acknowledgements.pdf).This research was specifically funded by NIH grants AA021399. GWAS data were generated by Sample Logistics and Genotyping Facilities at Wellcome Sanger Institute and LabCorp (Laboratory Corporation of America) using support from 23andMe. Generation Scotland is grateful to the families who took part in GS, the GPs and Scottish School of Primary Care for their help in recruiting them, and the whole GS team that includes academic researchers, clinic staff, laboratory technicians, clerical workers, IT staff, statisticians, and research managers. Generation Scotland received core support from the Chief Scientist Office of the Scottish Government Health Directorates (CZD/16/6) and the Scottish Funding Council (HR03006).Genotyping of the GS samples was carried out by the Genetics Core Laboratory at the Wellcome Trust Clinical Research Facility, Edinburgh, Scotland, and was funded by the Medical Research Council UK and the Wellcome Trust (Wellcome Trust Strategic Award 'STratifying Resilience and Depression Longitudinally' (STRADL) Reference 104036/Z/14/Z). LD Hub (http://ldsc.broadinstitute.org/) is grateful to the following GWAS studies, databases and consortia who have kindly made their summary data available: ADIPOGen (Adiponectin genetics consortium), C4D (Coronary Artery Disease Genetics Consortium), CARDIoGRAM (Coronary ARtery DIsease Genome wide Replication and Meta-analysis), CKDGen (Chronic Kidney Disease Genetics consortium), dbGAP (database of Genotypes and Phenotypes), DIAGRAM (DIAbetes Genetics Replication And Meta-analysis), ENIGMA (Enhancing Neuro Imaging Genetics through Meta Analysis), EAGLE (EArly Genetics & Lifecourse Epidemiology Consortium, excluding 23andMe), EGG (Early Growth Genetics Consortium), GABRIEL (A Multidisciplinary Study to Identify the Genetic and Environmental Causes of Asthma in the European Community), GCAN (Genetic Consortium for Anorexia Nervosa), GEFOS (GEnetic Factors for OSteoporosis Consortium), GIANT (Genetic Investigation of ANthropometric Traits), GIS (Genetics of Iron Status consortium), GLGC (Global Lipids Genetics Consortium), GPC (Genetics of Personality Consortium), GUGC (Global Urate and Gout consortium), HaemGen (hematological and platelet traits genetics consortium), HRgene (Heart Rate consortium), IIBDGC (International Inflammatory Bowel Disease Genetics Consortium), ILCCO (International Lung Cancer Consortium), IMSGC (International Multiple Sclerosis Genetic Consortium), MAGIC (Meta-Analyses of Glucose and Insulin-related traits Consortium), MESA (Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis), PGC (Psychiatric Genomics Consortium), Project MinE consortium, ReproGen (Reproductive Genetics Consortium), SSGAC (Social Science Genetics Association Consortium), TAG (Tobacco and Genetics Consortium), TRICL (Transdisciplinary Research in Cancer of the Lung consortium), and UK Biobank. We additionally thank the groups who directly shared GWAS results. We would like to acknowledge all participating groups of the International Cannabis Consortium, and in particular the members of the working group including S. Stringer, C. Minica, K. Verweij, H. Mbarek, E. Derks, N. Gillespie, and J. Vink. Thanks also to the ENIGMA consortium for providing GWAS results on subcortical brain volumes (available from http://enigma.ini.usc.edu/research/download-enigma-gwas-results/).Finally, we acknowledge the valuable contribution of groups who have publicly released summary statistics from their respective GWAS. Specifically, thanks to researchers from Schumann et al. 16 including the CHARGE+ and AlcGen consortia (results available at https://grasp.nhlbi.nih.gov/FullResults.aspx) and to all members of Psychiatric Genomics Consortium (PGC; results available for download at http://www.med.unc.edu/pgc/results-and-downloads), in particular the working groups on attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD; chaired by S. Faraone), autism spectrum disorder (ASD; chaired by M. Daly and B. Devlin), and eating disorders (ED; chaired by C. Bulik and G. Breen). Similar thanks to all of the participating groups in the Lundbeck Foundation Initiative for Integrative Psychiatric Research (iPSYCH) consortium for their participation in the ADHD and ASD meta-analyses.