Journal article

Redox dysregulation as a link between childhood trauma and psychopathological and neurocognitive profile in patients with early psychosis

Luis Alameda, Margot Fournier, Ines Khadimallah, Alessandra Griffa, Martine Cleusix, Raoul Jenni, Carina Ferrari, Paul Klauser, Philipp S Baumann, Michel Cuenod, Patric Hagmann, Philippe Conus, Kim Q Do

PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA | NATL ACAD SCIENCES | Published : 2018

Abstract

Exposure to childhood trauma (CT) increases the risk for psychosis and affects the development of brain structures, possibly through oxidative stress. As oxidative stress is also linked to psychosis, it may interact with CT, leading to a more severe clinical phenotype. In 133 patients with early psychosis (EPP), we explored the relationships between CT and hippocampal, amygdala, and intracranial volume (ICV); blood antioxidant defenses [glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and thioredoxin/peroxiredoxin (Trx/Prx)]; psychopathological results; and neuropsychological results. Nonadjusted hippocampal volume correlated negatively with GPx activity in patients with CT, but not in patients without CT. In p..

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Grants

Awarded by Swiss National Science Foundation


Awarded by National Center of Competence in Research "SYNAPSY-The Synaptic Bases of Mental Diseases" project - Swiss National Science Foundation


Funding Acknowledgements

We thank Gloria Reuteler, Adeline Cottier, and Helene Moser for their expert technical assistance and all collaborators of the Minkowski section for their invaluable help in recruiting patients. We thank all patients for their enduring participation. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy was performed at the Centre d'Imagerie BioMedicale of the Universite de Lausanne, Universite de Geneve, Hopitaux Universitaires de Geneve, CHUV, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Leenaards Foundation, and Jeantet Foundation. This work was supported by the Swiss National Science Foundation (Grant 320030_ 122419 to P.C. and K.Q.D., Grant 310030_ 156874 to P.H., and Grant P2LAP3_171804 to L.A.) and the National Center of Competence in Research "SYNAPSY-The Synaptic Bases of Mental Diseases" project financed by the Swiss National Science Foundation (Grant 51AU40_125759). P.S.B. is financially supported by the Leenaards Foundation. This study also received support from the Fondation Anita et Werner Damm-Etienne, Banque Lombard Odier & Cie SA, and Alamaya Foundation.