Journal article

A Polygenic Risk Score Derived From Episodic Memory Weighted Genetic Variants Is Associated With Cognitive Decline in Preclinical Alzheimer's Disease

Tenielle Porter, Samantha C Burnham, Greg Savage, Yen Ying Lim, Paul Maruff, Lidija Milicic, Madeline Peretti, David Ames, Colin L Masters, Ralph N Martins, Stephanie Rainey-Smith, Christopher C Rowe, Olivier Salvado, Kevin Taddei, David Groth, Giuseppe Verdile, Victor L Villemagne, Simon M Laws

FRONTIERS IN AGING NEUROSCIENCE | FRONTIERS MEDIA SA | Published : 2018

Abstract

Studies of Alzheimer's disease risk-weighted polygenic risk scores (PRSs) for cognitive performance have reported inconsistent associations. This inconsistency is particularly evident when PRSs are assessed independent of APOE genotype. As such, the development and assessment of phenotype-specific weightings to derive PRSs for cognitive decline in preclinical AD is warranted. To this end a episodic memory-weighted PRS (emPRS) was derived and assessed against decline in cognitive performance in 226 healthy cognitively normal older adults with high brain Aβ-amyloid burden participants from the Australian Imaging, Biomarkers and Lifestyle (AIBL) study. The effect size for decline in a verbal ep..

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Grants

Awarded by Cooperative Research Centre (CRC) for Mental Health - through the CRC Program, an Australian Government Initiative


Funding Acknowledgements

Funding for the AIBL study was provided in part by the study partners [Commonwealth Scientific Industrial and Research Organization (CSIRO), Edith Cowan University (ECU), Mental Health Research institute (MHRI), National Ageing Research Institute (NARI), Austin Health, CogState Ltd.]. The AIBL study has also received support from the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) and the Dementia Collaborative Research Centres program (DCRC2), as well as funding from the Science and Industry Endowment Fund (SIEF) and the Cooperative Research Centre (CRC) for Mental Health - funded through the CRC Program (Grant ID: 20100104), an Australian Government Initiative. The sponsors had no role in the design and conduct of the study, collection, management, analysis, and interpretation of the data, preparation, review or approval of the manuscript, and decision tosubmit the manuscript for publication.