Journal article

Microclimates Might Limit Indirect Spillover of the Bat Borne Zoonotic Hendra Virus

Gerardo Martin, Rebecca J Webb, Carla Chen, Raina K Plowright, Lee F Skerratt

MICROBIAL ECOLOGY | SPRINGER | Published : 2017

Abstract

Infectious diseases are transmitted when susceptible hosts are exposed to pathogen particles that can replicate within them. Among factors that limit transmission, the environment is particularly important for indirectly transmitted parasites. To try and assess a pathogens' ability to be transmitted through the environment and mitigate risk, we need to quantify its decay where transmission occurs in space such as the microclimate harbouring the pathogen. Hendra virus, a Henipavirus from Australian Pteropid bats, spills-over to horses and humans, causing high mortality. While a vaccine is available, its limited uptake has reduced opportunities for adequate risk management to humans, hence the..

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University of Melbourne Researchers

Grants

Awarded by NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF GENERAL MEDICAL SCIENCES


Funding Acknowledgements

The College of Public Health, Medical and Veterinary Sciences, James Cook University was contracted by the Rural Industries Research and Development Corporation to undertake this research project. This research was funded by the Commonwealth of Australia, the State of New South Wales and the State of Queensland under the National Hendra Virus Research Program. We would like to thank BVSc Bruce Pott for arranging contact with private horse owners to undertake this study, and Drs. Deborah Middleton and Paul Selleck for granting access to the HeV survival data.