Journal article

BASELINE CUTANEOUS BACTERIA OF FREE-LIVING NEW ZEALAND NATIVE FROGS (LEIOPELMA ARCHEYI AND LEIOPELMA HOCHSTETTERI) AND IMPLICATIONS FOR THEIR ROLE IN DEFENSE AGAINST THE AMPHIBIAN CHYTRID (BATRACHOCHYTRIUM DENDROBATIDIS)

Stephanie D Shaw, Lee Berger, Sara Bell, Sarah Dodd, Tim Y James, Lee F Skerratt, Phillip J Bishop, Rick Speare

JOURNAL OF WILDLIFE DISEASES | WILDLIFE DISEASE ASSOC, INC | Published : 2014

Abstract

Abstract Knowledge of baseline cutaneous bacterial microbiota may be useful in interpreting diagnostic cultures from captive sick frogs and as part of quarantine or pretranslocation disease screening. Bacteria may also be an important part of innate immunity against chytridiomycosis, a fungal skin disease caused by Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd). In February 2009, 92 distinct bacterial isolates from the ventral skin of 64 apparently healthy Leiopelma archeyi and Leiopelma hochstetteri native frogs from the Coromandel and Whareorino regions in New Zealand were identified using molecular techniques. The most-common isolates identified in L. archeyi were Pseudomonas spp. and the most commo..

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Grants

Funding Acknowledgements

Funding for this project was provided by the Auckland Zoo Charitable Trust Conservation Fund. Many thanks to the staff at Landcare Auckland who were instrumental in the bacterial culturing, identification, and storage of chytrid samples: Stanley Bellgard, Maureen Fletcher, Karen Hoksbergen, Daniel Than, Bevan Weir, and Paula Wilke. Thanks also to Lisa Daglish and Amanda Haigh from the Department of Conservation who collected the bacterial samples. Many thanks to Reid Harris, Brianna Lam, and Jennifer Walke for technical advice. Thanks also to the New Zealand Maori iwi for supporting native frog research.