Journal article

Initial severity of somatosensory impairment influences response to upper limb sensory retraining post-stroke

Megan L Turville, Thomas A Matyas, Jannette M Blennerhassett, Leeanne M Carey

NEUROREHABILITATION | IOS PRESS | Published : 2018

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Somatosensory loss occurs often following stroke. A proportional recovery model is proposed for spontaneous motor recovery, with implication for treatment planning. It is currently unknown if initial severity of sensory impairment influences stroke survivors' response to treatment to improve sensation. OBJECTIVE: To examine if initial (pre-treatment) severity of upper limb somatosensory impairment is related to sensation outcomes following treatment. METHODS: Regression analysis was used to investigate the relationship between initial and post-treatment sensation performance. Data were pooled from two randomized controlled trials of somatosensory discrimination retraining (N = 80..

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Grants

Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC)


Awarded by James S. McDonnell Foundation 21st Century Science Initiative in Cognitive Rehabilitation Collaborative Award


Awarded by Australian Research Council Future Fellowship


Awarded by NHMRC Career Development Award


Funding Acknowledgements

The research was funded by two National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) project grants (GNT191214: Effectiveness of training somatosensation in the hand after stroke: A randomized controlled trial and GNT1022684: Effective Sensory Rehabilitation After Stroke: Targeting Viable Brain Networks), the James S. McDonnell Foundation 21st Century Science Initiative in Cognitive Rehabilitation Collaborative Award (#220020413), an Australian Research Council Future Fellowship (FTO992299), and an NHMRC Career Development Award (307905) awarded to Leeanne M. Carey. Megan L. Turville was supported by an Australian Government Research Training Program Scholarship. The SENSe (ACTRN1260500060951) and CoNNECT(ACTRN12613001136796) trials are registered with the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry at https://www.anzctr.org.au.