Journal article

Maternal body mass index, excess gestational weight gain, and diabetes are positively associated with neonatal adiposity in the Pregnancy and Neonatal Diabetes Outcomes in Remote Australia (PANDORA) study

Danielle K Longmore, Elizabeth LM Barr, I-Lynn Lee, Federica Barzi, Marie Kirkwood, Cherie Whitbread, Vanya Hampton, Sian Graham, Paula Van Dokkum, Christine Connors, Jacqueline A Boyle, Patrick Catalano, Alex DH Brown, Kerin O'Dea, Jeremy Oats, H David McIntyre, Jonathan E Shaw, Louise J Maple-Brown, Stacey Svenson, Liz Davis

PEDIATRIC OBESITY | WILEY | Published : 2019

Abstract

BACKGROUND: In-utero exposures likely influence the onset and severity of obesity in youth. With increasing rates of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and maternal adiposity in pregnancy globally, it is important to assess the impact of these factors on neonatal adipose measures. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the contribution of maternal ethnicity, body mass index (BMI), gestational weight gain, and hyperglycaemia to neonatal adiposity. METHODS: Pregnancy and Neonatal Diabetes Outcomes in Remote Australia (PANDORA) is a longitudinal cohort study of Australian mother and neonate pairs. In this analysis, Indigenous (n = 519) and Europid (n = 358) women were included, of whom 644 had hyperglycaemia (ty..

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Grants

Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia


Awarded by National Heart Foundation


Funding Acknowledgements

National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia, Grant/Award Numbers: 1032216, 1038372, 1078333, 1078477, 1079438, 605837 and 1032116; National Heart Foundation, Grant/Award Number: 101291