Journal article

How are the built environment and household travel characteristics associated with children's active transport in Melbourne, Australia?

A Carver, A Barr, A Singh, H Badland, S Mavoa, R Bentley

JOURNAL OF TRANSPORT & HEALTH | ELSEVIER SCI LTD | Published : 2019

Abstract

Background: Children's active transport (AT) is a potential source of habitual physical activity with established health benefits. We aimed to examine built environment and household travel characteristics as predictors of AT to school and total daily duration of physical activity accumulated via AT. Methods: Cross-sectional household travel survey data from 713 households with children aged 5–12 years (n = 1024) residing < 2 km from school (i.e. walking distance) across Melbourne, Australia (2012–16) were combined with objectively-measured distance to school and walkability (based on intersection density, housing density, land use mix) around home and school. Multilevel multivariable modifi..

View full abstract

Grants

Awarded by Australian Research Council (ARC)


Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Early Career Fellowship


Awarded by Australian Research Council Future Fellowship


Funding Acknowledgements

This study is funded by an Australian Research Council (ARC) Linkage Project Grant (LP140100680), in partnership with the Victorian Health Promotion Foundation (VicHealth), the Victorian Department of Economic Development, Jobs, Transport and Resources (DEDJTR), and the Victorian Roads Corporation (VicRoads). The contents of this manuscript are the responsibility of the authors and do not reflect the views of the funding bodies.SM is supported by an National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Early Career Fellowship (#11201035).HB is supported by an RMIT University Vice Chancellor's Senior Research Fellowship and the Australian Health Promotion Association Thinker in Residence.RB is supported by an Australian Research Council Future Fellowship (150100131).