Journal article

Adrenergic Receptors Modulate Motoneuron Excitability, Sensory Synaptic Transmission and Muscle Spasms After Chronic Spinal Cord Injury

MM Rank, KC Murray, MJ Stephens, J D'Amico, MA Gorassini, DJ Bennett

JOURNAL OF NEUROPHYSIOLOGY | AMER PHYSIOLOGICAL SOC | Published : 2011

Abstract

The brain stem provides most of the noradrenaline (NA) present in the spinal cord, which functions to both increase spinal motoneuron excitability and inhibit sensory afferent transmission to motoneurons (excitatory postsynaptic potentials; EPSPs). NA increases motoneuron excitability by facilitating calcium-mediated persistent inward currents (Ca PICs) that are crucial for sustained motoneuron firing. Spinal cord transection eliminates most NA and accordingly causes an immediate loss of PICs and emergence of exaggerated EPSPs. However, with time PICs recover, and thus the exaggerated EPSPs can then readily trigger these PICs, which in turn produce muscle spasms. Here we examined the contrib..

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University of Melbourne Researchers

Grants

Awarded by National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke


Awarded by NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF NEUROLOGICAL DISORDERS AND STROKE


Funding Acknowledgements

Funding was provided by National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Grants RO1 NS-47567-01 to D. J. Bennett and RO1 NS-48170-01 to M. A. Gorassini, Canadian Foundation for Innovation, the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, and the Alberta Heritage Foundation for Medical Research. The authors acknowledge Recordati S.p.A (Milano, Italy) for the generous donation of REC15/2739.