Journal article

Modular Metal-Organic Polyhedra Superassembly: From Molecular-Level Design to Targeted Drug Delivery

Wei Zhu, Jimin Guo, Yi Ju, Rita E Serda, Jonas G Croissant, Jin Shang, Eric Coker, Jacob Ongudi Agola, Qi-Zhi Zhong, Yuan Ping, Frank Caruso, C Jeffrey Brinker

Advanced Materials | Wiley | Published : 2019

Abstract

Targeted drug delivery remains at the forefront of biomedical research but remains a challenge to date. Herein, the first superassembly of nanosized metal–organic polyhedra (MOP) and their biomimetic coatings of lipid bilayers are described to synergistically combine the advantages of micelles and supramolecular coordination cages for targeted drug delivery. The superassembly technique affords unique hydrophobic features that endow individual MOP to act as nanobuilding blocks and enable their superassembly into larger and well‐defined nanocarriers with homogeneous sizes over a broad range of diameters. Various cargos are controllably loaded into the MOP with high payloads, and the nanocages ..

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Grants

Awarded by NIH


Awarded by U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration


Awarded by UNM Comprehensive Cancer Center NCI


Awarded by Australian Research Council (ARC) Centre of Excellence in Convergent Bio-Nano Science and Technology


Awarded by National Health Medical Research Council Senior Principal Research Fellowship


Funding Acknowledgements

W.Z. and J.G. contributed equally to this work. C.J.B. and W.Z. acknowledge support from the University of New Mexico Center for Micro-Engineered Materials. C.J.B. and R.S. acknowledge support from NIH RO1 (FP0003261). C.J.B. acknowledges support by the Sandia National Laboratory Laboratory-Directed Research and Development Program and support from the Department of Energy Office of Science, Division of Materials Science and Engineering. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the NSF. Sandia National Laboratories is a multimission laboratory managed and operated by National Technology and Engineering Solutions of Sandia, LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Honey-well International, Inc., for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract No. DENA-0003525. This paper describes objective technical results and analysis. Any subjective views or opinions that might be expressed in the paper do not necessarily represent the views of the U.S. Department of Energy or the United States Government. R.S. acknowledges use of the UNM Animal Models and Microscopy facilities, supported by UNM Comprehensive Cancer Center NCI under Grant No. 2P30 CA118100-11. Part of this work was conducted and funded by the Australian Research Council (ARC) Centre of Excellence in Convergent Bio-Nano Science and Technology (project number CE140100036). F.C. acknowledges the award of a National Health Medical Research Council Senior Principal Research Fellowship (APP1135806).