Journal article

Extensive elemental mapping unlocks Mg/Ca ratios as climate proxy in seasonal records of Mediterranean limpets

N Hausmann, AL Prendergast, A Lemonis, J Zech, P Roberts, P Siozos, D Anglos

SCIENTIFIC REPORTS | NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP | Published : 2019

Abstract

Elemental analysis of biogeochemical archives is an established technique used to study climate in a range of applications, including ocean circulation, glacial/interglacial climates, and anthropogenic climate change. Data from mollusc archives are especially important because of their global abundance and sub-annual resolution. Despite this potential, they are underrepresented among palaeoclimate studies, due to enigmatic physiological influences skewing the elemental record. Understanding the patterns behind these influences will improve data interpretation and lead to the development of new climate proxies. Here, we show for the first time that extensive spatial mapping of multiple mollus..

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Grants

Awarded by European Commission H-2020 Program through the Marie Sklodowska-Curie Individual Fellowship project 'ACCELERATE'


Awarded by project "HELLAS-CH" under the "Action for Strengthening Research and Innovation Infrastructures" - Operational Programme "Competitiveness, Entrepreneurship and Innovation" (NSRF 2014-2020)


Funding Acknowledgements

This study was funded in part by the European Commission H-2020 Program through the Marie Sklodowska-Curie Individual Fellowship project 'ACCELERATE' (Grant Agreement No. 703625). We also acknowledge support by the project "HELLAS-CH" (MIS 5002735), implemented under the "Action for Strengthening Research and Innovation Infrastructures", funded by the Operational Programme "Competitiveness, Entrepreneurship and Innovation" (NSRF 2014-2020) and co-financed by Greece and the European Union (European Regional Development Fund). We thank the three anonymous reviewers for their valuable comments and for grealty improving our study. We further thank Alexandra Manousaki for acquiring SEM images, Harry Robson for helping with modern shellfish collection in Greece, and Andre Colonese for improving the manuscript in its early stages.