Journal article

Computerized Cognitive Training for Older Adults at Higher Dementia Risk due to Diabetes: Findings From a Randomized Controlled Trial

Alex Bahar-Fuchs, Marjolein EA Barendse, Rachel Bloom, Ramit Ravona-Springer, Anthony Heymann, Hai Dabush, Lior Bar, Shire Slater-Barkan, Yuri Rassovsky, Michel Schnaider Beeri

The Journals of Gerontology: Series A | OXFORD UNIV PRESS INC | Published : 2020

Abstract

BACKGROUND: To evaluate the effects of adaptive and tailored computerized cognitive training on cognition and disease self-management in older adults with diabetes. METHODS: This was a single-blind trial. Eighty-four community-dwelling older adults with diabetes were randomized into a tailored and adaptive computerized cognitive training or a generic, non-tailored or adaptive computerized cognitive training condition. Both groups trained for 8 weeks on the commercially available CogniFit program and were supported by a range of behavior change techniques. Participants in each condition were further randomized into a global or cognition-specific self-efficacy intervention, or to a no self-eff..

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University of Melbourne Researchers

Grants

Awarded by Maccabi Health Services (MHS)


Awarded by Australian National Health and Medical Research Council


Awarded by National Institute on Aging


Funding Acknowledgements

This work was supported by Maccabi Health Services (MHS; grant no. 25860 to M.S.B.). The funding source played no role in the design and implementation of the trial, analysis and interpretation of the data, or preparation of the manuscript. The CCT platform was donated by CogniFit. CogniFit or its employees played no role in the design and implementation of the trial, analysis and interpretation of the data, or preparation of the manuscript. R.B. was supported by the Vice-Chancellor Award from Bar Ilan University, Israel. A.B-F. was supported by an Australian National Health and Medical Research Council fellowship (grant no. 1072688). M.S.B. was supported by the National Institute on Aging (grant no. R01-AG-034087). A.H. is an employee of MHS who provided funding for this study. The authors declare that they have no competing interests.