Journal article

A case study of enhanced clinical care enabled by Aboriginal health research: the Hearing, EAr health and Language Services (HEALS) project

Christian Young, Hasantha Gunasekera, Kelvin Kong, Alison Purcell, Sumithra Muthayya, Frank Vincent, Darryl Wright, Raylene Gordon, Jennifer Bell, Guy Gillor, Julie Booker, Peter Fernando, Deanna Kalucy, Simone Sherriff, Allison Tong, Carmen Parter, Sandra Bailey, Sally Redman, Emily Banks, Jonathan C Craig

AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH | WILEY | Published : 2016

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To describe and evaluate Hearing EAr health and Language Services (HEALS), a New South Wales (NSW) health initiative implemented in 2013 and 2014 as a model for enhanced clinical services arising from Aboriginal health research. METHODS: A case-study involving a mixed-methods evaluation of the origins and outcomes of HEALS, a collaboration among five NSW Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services (ACCHS), the Sydney Children's Hospitals Network, NSW Health, the Aboriginal Health and Medical Research Council, and local service providers. Service delivery data was collected fortnightly; semi-structured interviews were conducted with healthcare providers and caregivers of childr..

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Grants

Awarded by SEARCH (Study of Environment on Aboriginal Resilience and Child Health: NHMRC)


Awarded by NHMRC


Funding Acknowledgements

Funding for the HEALS project was secured in 2013 when the Commonwealth provided the NSW Ministry of Health with one-off funding of $950,000 under the Improving eye and ear health services for Indigenous Australians for better education and employment outcomes measure, an initiative to deliver additional ear surgery and associated specialist services for Aboriginal people under 21 years. HEALS was refunded in 2015 and 2016.This evaluation and the overall HEALS network was supported by SEARCH (Study of Environment on Aboriginal Resilience and Child Health: NHMRC Project Grant #1023998, NHMRC Partnership Grant #1035378 and APHCRI Centre Research Excellence in Urban Aboriginal Child Health).