Journal article

Inflammatory diet and preclinical cardiovascular phenotypes in 11-12 year-olds and mid-life adults: A cross-sectional population-based study

Addison Davis, Richard Liu, Jessica A Kerr, Melissa Wake, Anneke Grobler, Markus Juonala, Mengjiao Liu, Louise Baur, David Burgner, Kate Lycett

Atherosclerosis | ELSEVIER IRELAND LTD | Published : 2019

Grants

Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia (NHMRC)


Awarded by Royal Children's Hospital Foundation


Awarded by National Heart Foundation of Australia


Awarded by Financial Markets Foundation for Children


Awarded by NHMRC


Awarded by Honorary Future Leader Fellowship of the National Heart Foundation of Australia


Awarded by National Heart Foundation Postdoctoral Fellowship


Funding Acknowledgements

This work has been supported to date by the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia (NHMRC; 1041352, 1109355), The Royal Children's Hospital Foundation (2014-241), Murdoch Children's Research Institute, The University of Melbourne, National Heart Foundation of Australia (100660), Financial Markets Foundation for Children (2014-055; 2016-310) and Victoria Deaf Education Institute. RL and ML are supported by PhD scholarships: RL by NHMRC (APP1114567) and ML by a Melbourne Research Scholarship. MJ is supported by Juho Vainio Foundation and federal research grants to Turku University Hospital. MW was supported by an NHMRC Senior Research Fellowship (APP1046518 and Cure Kids New Zealand). DB is supported by an NHMRC Fellowship (APP1064629) and an Honorary Future Leader Fellowship of the National Heart Foundation of Australia (100369). KL is supported by an NHMRC Early Career Fellowship (APP1091124) and a National Heart Foundation Postdoctoral Fellowship (101239). Research at the Murdoch Children's Research Institute is supported by the Victorian Government's Operational Infrastructure Program. The funding bodies did not play any role in the study. This paper uses unit record data from the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children. The study is conducted in partnership between the Department of Social Services (DSS), the Australian Institute of Family Studies (AIFS) and the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS). The findings and views reported in this paper are those of the author and should not be attributed to DSS, AIFS or the ABS.