Journal article

Contrasted East Asia and South America tectonics driven by deep mantle flow

Ting Yang, Louis Moresi, Michael Gurnis, Shaofeng Liu, Dan Sandiford, Simon Williams, Fabio A Capitanio

EARTH AND PLANETARY SCIENCE LETTERS | ELSEVIER | Published : 2019

Abstract

East Asia and South America have both experienced long-term subduction since at least the Jurassic, but they have had contrasting tectonic evolutions since the Late Cretaceous. East Asia was dominated by extensional tectonics with many marginal sea basins forming during the Cenozoic while South America was dominated by compressional tectonics building the Andean mountains. The mechanism controlling this contrast in tectonic style on opposite sides of the Pacific has been unclear. We suggest that the deep mantle flow revealed by seismic tomography, plate reconstructions, and geodynamic models contributed to the pan-Pacific tectonic disparity. Our geodynamic models suggest that the Atlantic Oc..

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University of Melbourne Researchers

Grants

Awarded by Australian Research Council Discovery Program


Awarded by Australian Research Council's Industrial Transformation Research Hub project


Awarded by Australian Research Council


Awarded by National Natural Science Foundation of China


Awarded by Strategic Priority Research Program (B) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences


Awarded by NSF


Funding Acknowledgements

Ting Yang benefited enormously from the discussions with the AuScope Underworld Geodynamics group and Guangwei Li. Kevin Hill helped review the primary version of the paper. Two anonymous reviewers helped significantly in improving the paper. This work is supported by the Australian Research Council Discovery Program DP150102887, and by the by Australian Research Council's Industrial Transformation Research Hub project IH130200012. SW is funded by Australian Research Council grant IH130200012 and DP180102280. SL and MG are supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (41820104004). SL is supported by the Strategic Priority Research Program (B) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. XDB18000000). MG is supported through NSF EAR-1645775.