Journal article

Higher frequency of Central Pacific El Nino events in recent decades relative to past centuries

Mandy B Freund, Benjamin J Henley, David J Karoly, Helen V McGregor, Nerilie J Abram, Dietmar Dommenget

Nature Geoscience | NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP | Published : 2019

Abstract

El Niño events differ substantially in their spatial pattern and intensity. Canonical Eastern Pacific El Niño events have sea surface temperature anomalies that are strongest in the far eastern equatorial Pacific, whereas peak ocean warming occurs further west during Central Pacific El Niño events. The event types differ in their impacts on the location and intensity of temperature and precipitation anomalies globally. Evidence is emerging that Central Pacific El Niño events have become more common, a trend that is projected by some studies to continue with ongoing climate change. Here we identify spatial and temporal patterns in observed sea surface temperatures that distinguish the evoluti..

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Grants

Awarded by Australian Research Council (ARC) Centre of Excellence for Climate System Science


Awarded by ARC Linkage Project


Awarded by ARC Centre of Excellence for Climate Extremes


Awarded by ARC Future Fellowship


Funding Acknowledgements

M.B.F., B.J.H, D.J.K. and D.D. were supported by the Australian Research Council (ARC) Centre of Excellence for Climate System Science (CE110001028). B.J.H. is supported through an ARC Linkage Project (LP150100062). B.J.H, N.J.A. and D.D. are supported by the ARC Centre of Excellence for Climate Extremes (CE170100023). H.V.M. acknowledges support from ARC Future Fellowship (FT140100286). N.J.A. acknowledges support from ARC Future Fellowship (FT160100029). D.J.K. is supported by the Earth Systems and Climate Change Hub in the Australian Government's National Environmental Science Program.