Journal article

Interactive impact of childhood maltreatment, depression, and age on cortical brain structure: mega-analytic findings from a large multi-site cohort

Leonardo Tozzi, Lisa Garczarek, Deborah Janowitz, Dan J Stein, Katharina Wittfeld, Henrik Dobrowolny, Jim Lagopoulos, Sean N Hatton, Ian B Hickie, Angela Carballedo, Samantha J Brooks, Daniella Vuletic, Anne Uhlmann, Ilya M Veer, Henrik Walter, Robin Buelow, Henry Voelzke, Johanna Klinger-Koenig, Knut Schnell, Dieter Schoepf Show all

Psychological Medicine | CAMBRIDGE UNIV PRESS | Published : 2020

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Childhood maltreatment (CM) plays an important role in the development of major depressive disorder (MDD). The aim of this study was to examine whether CM severity and type are associated with MDD-related brain alterations, and how they interact with sex and age. METHODS: Within the ENIGMA-MDD network, severity and subtypes of CM using the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire were assessed and structural magnetic resonance imaging data from patients with MDD and healthy controls were analyzed in a mega-analysis comprising a total of 3872 participants aged between 13 and 89 years. Cortical thickness and surface area were extracted at each site using FreeSurfer. RESULTS: CM severity was ..

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Grants

Awarded by German Research Foundation


Awarded by Interdisciplinary Center for Clinical Research (IZKF) of the medical faculty of Munster


Awarded by German Research Foundation (DFG)


Awarded by NIH Institutes contributing


Awarded by NIH BD2 K award


Awarded by German Federal Ministry of Education and Research


Awarded by National Institute of Mental Health


Awarded by American Foundation for Suicide Prevention



Funding Acknowledgements

The Munster Neuroimaging Cohort was funded by the German Research Foundation (SFB-TRR58, Projects C09 and Z02 to UD) and the Interdisciplinary Center for Clinical Research (IZKF) of the medical faculty of Munster (grant Dan3/012/17 to UD). FOR2107-Marburg was funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG, grant FOR2107 KI588/14-1, KI588/15-1, KI588/14-2, KI588/15-2 to TK, KR3822/5-1 to AK). FOR2107-Munster was funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG, grant FOR2107 HA 7070/2-2 to TH; DA1151/5-1 and DA1151/5-2 to UD). ENIGMA was supported in part by a Consortium grant (U54 EB020403 to PMT, DPH, NJ) from the NIH Institutes contributing to the Big Data to Knowledge (BD2 K) Initiative, and by R01 MH116147 and R56 AG058854. Moreover, an NIH BD2 K award, U54EB020403 to T.G.M. van Erp. London: This paper represents independent research [part] funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Biomedical Research Centre at South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust and King's College London. The views expressed are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of the NHS, the NIHR or the Department of Health and Social Care. SHIP: The Study of Health in Pomerania (SHIP) is supported by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (grants 01ZZ9603, 01ZZ0103, and 01ZZ0403) the Ministry of Cultural Affairs as well as the Social Ministry of the Federal State of Mecklenburg-West Pomerania. MRI scans were supported by Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen, Germany. SHIP-LEGEND was supported by the German Research Foundation (GR1912/5-1). Dublin: The study was supported by a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) Stokes Professorship Grant to Thomas Frodl. San Francisco: This work was supported by the Brain and Behavior Research Foundation (formerly NARSAD) to T.T.Y.; the National Institute of Mental Health (R01MH085734 to T.T.Y.; K01MH097978 to K.Z.L.; K01MH117442 to T.C.H.) and by the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention (PDF-1-064-13) to T.C.H.