Journal article

Higher levels of greenness and biodiversity associate with greater subjective wellbeing in adults living in Melbourne, Australia

Suzanne Mavoa, Melanie Davern, Martin Breed, Amy Hahs

HEALTH & PLACE | ELSEVIER SCI LTD | Published : 2019

Abstract

Natural environments may be important for subjective wellbeing, yet evidence is sparse and measures of nature are unspecific. We used linear regression models to investigate the relationship between greenness, biodiversity and blue space and subjective wellbeing in 4,912 adults living in metropolitan Melbourne, Australia. Greenness (overall, private and public) and biodiversity associated with subjective wellbeing. In particular, we highlight the importance of the private greenness-subjective wellbeing association. Our work has implications for urban policy and planning in the context of increased urban densification.

Grants

Awarded by Australian National Health and Medical Research Council Early Career Fellowship


Funding Acknowledgements

SM is supported by an Australian National Health and Medical Research Council Early Career Fellowship (#1121035). MD is supported by the National Environmental Science Program Clean Air and Urban Landscapes Hub. Rebecca Roberts compiled the NDVI data. Statistical advice was provided by Cameron Patrick from the University of Melbourne Statistical Consulting Centre.