Journal article

Sensing Sociability: Individual Differences in Young Adults' Conversation, Calling, Texting, and App Use Behaviors in Daily Life

Gabriella M Harari, Sandrine R Mueller, Clemens Stachl, Rui Wang, Weichen Wang, Markus Buehner, Peter J Rentfrow, Andrew T Campbell, Samuel D Gosling

JOURNAL OF PERSONALITY AND SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY | AMER PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSOC | Published : 2020

Abstract

Sociability as a disposition describes a tendency to affiliate with others (vs. be alone). Yet, we know relatively little about how much social behavior people engage in during a typical day. One challenge to documenting social behavior tendencies is the broad number of channels over which socializing can occur, both in-person and through digital media. To examine individual differences in everyday social behavior patterns, here we used smartphone-based mobile sensing methods (MSMs) in four studies (total N = 926) to collect real-world data about young adults' social behaviors across four communication channels: conversations, phone calls, text messages, and use of messaging and social media..

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Grants

Awarded by National Science Foundation (NSF)


Funding Acknowledgements

The research was supported in part by National Science Foundation (NSF) Award BCS-1520288. We thank Joanne Chung, Elliot Tucker-Drob, Gregory Hixon, Matthias Mehl, and James Pennebaker for their helpful feedback on earlier versions of the work presented in this article. To contribute to a descriptive foundation for research on behavioral sociability patterns, we have shared our data and analytic scripts on the Open Science Framework (https://osf.io/p9rz3/).