Journal article

Youth to adult body mass index trajectories as a predictor of metabolically healthy obesity in adulthood

Kylie J Smith, Costan G Magnussen, Katja Pahkala, Juha Koskinen, Matthew A Sabin, Nina Hutri-Kahonen, Mika Kahonen, Tomi Laitinen, Tuija Tammelin, Paivi Tossavainen, Eero Jokinen, Jorma SA Viikari, Markus Juonala, Olli T Raitakari

European Journal of Public Health | OXFORD UNIV PRESS | Published : 2020

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Adiposity in childhood and adolescence (youth) has been shown to associate with adult metabolic health. What is not known, is whether youth body mass index (BMI) associates with metabolically healthy obesity (MHO) in adulthood, and if so, the age when the BMI to MHO association emerges. This study aimed to determine if BMI trajectories from youth to adulthood differed between adults with MHO and metabolically unhealthy obesity (MUHO). METHODS: The Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study had measured weight and height up to eight times in individuals from youth (3-18 years in 1980) to adulthood (24-49 years). Adult MHO was defined as BMI ≥ 30 kg m-2, normal fasting glucose (<5.6 ..

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Grants

Awarded by Academy of Finland


Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council


Awarded by National Heart Foundation of Australia Future Leader Fellowship


Funding Acknowledgements

The Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study was supported by the Academy of Finland grants [117797, 121584, 126925], the Social Insurance Institution of Finland, Tampere and Turku University Hospital Medical Funds, Juho Vainio Foundation, Paavo Nurmi Foundation, the Orion-Farmos Research Foundation and the Finnish Foundation of Cardiovascular Research. This work was partly funded by the National Health and Medical Research Council Project Grant [APP1098369]. K.J.S. was supported by a National Health and Medical Research Council Early Career Fellowship [APP1072516], C.G.M. was supported by a National Heart Foundation of Australia Future Leader Fellowship [100849]. K.P. is supported by the Academy of Finland. The funding bodies had no role in the study design; collection, analysis or interpretation of the data; writing of the report; or the decision to submit the report for publication.