Journal article

Comparative genome analysis indicates high evolutionary potential of pathogenicity genes in Colletotrichum tanaceti

Ruvini Lelwala, Pasi K Korhonen, Neil D Young, Jason B Scott, Peter K Ades, Robin B Gasser, Paul WJ Taylor

PLOS ONE | PUBLIC LIBRARY SCIENCE | Published : 2019

Abstract

Colletotrichum tanaceti is an emerging foliar fungal pathogen of commercially grown pyrethrum (Tanacetum cinerariifolium). Despite being reported consistently from field surveys in Australia, the molecular basis of pathogenicity of C. tanaceti on pyrethrum is unknown. Herein, the genome of C. tanaceti (isolate BRIP57314) was assembled de novo and annotated using transcriptomic evidence. The inferred putative pathogenicity gene suite of C. tanaceti comprised a large array of genes encoding secreted effectors, proteases, CAZymes and secondary metabolites. Comparative analysis of its putative pathogenicity gene profiles with those of closely related species suggested that C. tanaceti likely has..

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Grants

Awarded by NHMRC Career Development Fellowship


Awarded by NHMRC Early Career Research Fellowship


Funding Acknowledgements

This research was funded by Botanical Resources Australia - Agricultural Services, Pty. Ltd-(https://www.botanicalresources.com/). Ruvini V. Lelwala received Melbourne International Fee Remission Scholarship and Melbourne International Research Scholarship from the University of Melbourne, Australia (https://www.unimelb.edu.au/).ND Young was supported by NHMRC Career Development Fellowship - APP1109829 (https://nhmrc.gov.au/).PK Korhonen was supported by NHMRC Early Career Research Fellowship - APP1127033 (https://nhmrc.gov.au/).The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish or Preparation of the manuscript.We thank Dr Kym Pham and Dr Arthur Hsu for performing library preparation, sequencing and genome assembly which were conducted at the Melbourne Translational Genomics Platform (Department of Pathology, University of Melbourne). We also thank Botanical Resources Australia-Agricultural Services, Pty. Ltd for supporting the project. RVL received Melbourne International Fee Remission Scholarship and Melbourne International Research Scholarship from the University of Melbourne, Australia. NDY was supported by a Career Development Fellowship (CDF) from NHMRC. PKK was supported by an Early Career Fellowship (CDF) from NHMRC.