Journal article

Scientists' warning to humanity: microorganisms and climate change

Ricardo Cavicchioli, William J Ripple, Kenneth N Timmis, Farooq Azam, Lars R Bakken, Matthew Baylis, Michael J Behrenfeld, Antje Boetius, Philip W Boyd, Aimee T Classen, Thomas W Crowther, Roberto Danovaro, Christine M Foreman, Jef Huisman, David A Hutchins, Janet K Jansson, David M Karl, Britt Koskella, David B Mark Welch, Jennifer BH Martiny Show all

Nature Reviews Microbiology | NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP | Published : 2019

Abstract

In the Anthropocene, in which we now live, climate change is impacting most life on Earth. Microorganisms support the existence of all higher trophic life forms. To understand how humans and other life forms on Earth (including those we are yet to discover) can withstand anthropogenic climate change, it is vital to incorporate knowledge of the microbial 'unseen majority'. We must learn not just how microorganisms affect climate change (including production and consumption of greenhouse gases) but also how they will be affected by climate change and other human activities. This Consensus Statement documents the central role and global importance of microorganisms in climate change biology. It..

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University of Melbourne Researchers

Grants

Awarded by US Department of Energy, Office of Biological and Environmental Research, Soil Microbiome Scientific Focus Area 'Phenotypic Response of the Soil Microbiome to Environmental Perturbations' at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory


Awarded by Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation


Awarded by National Science Foundation


Awarded by Department of Energy Genomic Sciences Program


Awarded by National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Interdisciplinary Research in Earth Science programme


Funding Acknowledgements

R. C. is indebted to T. Kolesnikow, K. Cavicchioli and X. Kolesnikow for assistance with figures and insightful comments on manuscript drafts. R.C.'s contribution was supported by the Australian Research Council. M.J.B.'s contribution was supported by the NASA North Atlantic Aerosol and Marine Ecosystem Study. Research by J.K.J was supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Biological and Environmental Research, Soil Microbiome Scientific Focus Area 'Phenotypic Response of the Soil Microbiome to Environmental Perturbations' at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, under contract DE-AC05-76RLO 1830. M.B.S.'s contribution was supported by funds from the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation (#3790) and National Science Foundation (OCE#1829831). V.I.R.'s contribution was supported by funds from the Department of Energy Genomic Sciences Program (#DE-SC0016440) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Interdisciplinary Research in Earth Science programme (#NNX17AK10G).