Journal article

Absence of Detectable Influenza RNA Transmitted via Aerosol during Various Human Respiratory Activities - Experiments from Singapore and Hong Kong

Julian W Tang, Caroline X Gao, Benjamin J Cowling, Gerald C Koh, Daniel Chu, Cherie Heilbronn, Belinda Lloyd, Jovan Pantelic, Andre D Nicolle, Christian A Klettner, JS Malik Peiris, Chandra Sekhar, David KW Cheong, Kwok Wai Tham, Evelyn SC Koay, Wendy Tsui, Alfred Kwong, Kitty Chan, Yuguo Li

PLOS ONE | PUBLIC LIBRARY SCIENCE | Published : 2014

Abstract

Two independent studies by two separate research teams (from Hong Kong and Singapore) failed to detect any influenza RNA landing on, or inhaled by, a life-like, human manikin target, after exposure to naturally influenza-infected volunteers. For the Hong Kong experiments, 9 influenza-infected volunteers were recruited to breathe, talk/count and cough, from 0.1 m and 0.5 m distance, onto a mouth-breathing manikin. Aerosolised droplets exhaled from the volunteers and entering the manikin's mouth were collected with PTFE filters and an aerosol sampler, in separate experiments. Virus detection was performed using an in-house influenza RNA reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) ..

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University of Melbourne Researchers

Grants

Awarded by Area of Excellence Scheme of the Hong Kong University Grants Committee


Awarded by RGC GRF


Awarded by Singapore's National Medical Research Council


Awarded by Agency for Science, Technology and Research


Funding Acknowledgements

Funding for the Hong Kong study was supported by the Area of Excellence Scheme of the Hong Kong University Grants Committee (grant no. AoE/M-12/06) and a RGC GRF grant (HKU7142/12). Funding for the Singapore study and support for post-doctoral research fellows ADN and CAK were provided by grants to JWT/ESCK from Singapore's National Medical Research Council (NMRC/1208/2009 and NMRC/1247/2010) and Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR: SERC 1021290099), respectively. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.