Journal article

Associations of built environment attributes with bicycle use for transport

Mohammad Javad Koohsari, Rachel Cole, Koichiro Oka, Ai Shibata, Akitomo Yasunaga, Tomoya Hanibuchi, Neville Owen, Takemi Sugiyama

Environment and Planning B Urban Analytics and City Science | SAGE PUBLICATIONS LTD | Published : 2020

Abstract

An increasing number of studies have examined neighbourhood built environment attributes associated with cycling. Some of them suggest non-linear relationships between built environment attributes and cycling. This study examined the strength and shape of associations of cycling for transport with objectively measured built environment attributes. Data were from 9146 Australian adults who took part in the 2009 South-East Queensland Travel Survey. Participants (aged 18–64 years) completed a 24-hour travel survey, in which they reported modes of travel. Residential density, Walk Score and a Space Syntax measure of street integration were calculated at a neighbourhood level using geographic inf..

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Grants

Awarded by JSPS Postdoctoral Fellowship for Research in Japan from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science


Awarded by Japan Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology


Awarded by Japan Society for the Promotion of Science


Awarded by JSPS KAKENHI


Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia (NHMRC) Centre of Research Excellence grant


Funding Acknowledgements

The author(s) disclosed receipt of the following financial support for the research, authorship, and/or publication of this article: MJK was supported by a JSPS Postdoctoral Fellowship for Research in Japan (#17716) from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science. KO is supported by the MEXTSupported Program for the Strategic Research Foundation at Private Universities, 2015-2019 the Japan Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (S1511017). AS was supported by Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (C:No. 15K01647) from Japan Society for the Promotion of Science. TH was supported by the JSPS KAKENHI (#JP17H00947). NO was supported by a National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia (NHMRC) Centre of Research Excellence grant (#1057608) and a Senior Principal Research Fellowship (#1118225) and the Victorian government's operational infrastructure fund.