Journal article

Population density is beneficially associated with 12-year diabetes risk marker change among residents of lower socio-economic neighborhoods

Jelle Van Cauwenberg, David Dunstan, Ester Cerin, Mohammad Javad Koohsari, Takemi Sugiyama, Neville Owen

Health & Place | ELSEVIER SCI LTD | Published : 2019

Abstract

We examined associations of neighborhood population density with 12-year changes in diabetes risk (post-challenge plasma glucose), and potential moderation by neighborhood socio-economic status (SES) among 4,816 Australians. In lower SES neighborhoods, post-challenge plasma glucose increased by 6% in low-density, remained stable in medium-density and decreased by 3% in high-density neighborhoods. In medium SES neighborhoods, glucose remained stable in high-density, but increased by 2% and 3% in medium- and low-density neighborhoods, respectively. In higher SES neighborhoods, no significant interaction effect between time and density was observed. Densification may make protective contributio..

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Grants

Awarded by Research Foundation Flanders (FWO)


Awarded by Australian Research Council Future Fellowship


Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) of Australia


Awarded by NHMRC Senior Research Fellowship


Awarded by JSPS Postdoctoral Fellowship for Research in Japan from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science



Funding Acknowledgements

JVC is supported by a postdoctoral fellowship of the Research Foundation Flanders (FWO, 12I1117N). EC is supported by an Australian Research Council Future Fellowship FT3 140100085. NO was supported by a National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) of Australia Program Grant (#569940), a Senior Principal Research Fellowship (#1003960) and by the Victorian Government's Operational Infrastructure Support program. DD was supported by a NHMRC Senior Research Fellowship (NHMRC 1078360) and the Victorian Government's Operational Infrastructure Support Program. MJK is supported by a JSPS Postdoctoral Fellowship for Research in Japan (#17716) from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science.r The AusDiab study has received financial support from the Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing; Abbott Australasia; Alphapharm; AstraZeneca; Aventis Pharma; Bio-Rad Laboratories; Bristol-Myers Squibb; City Health Centre Diabetes Service Canberra; Department of Health and Community Services Northern Territory; Department of Health and Human Services Tasmania; Department of Health New South Wales; Department of Health Western Australia; Department of Human Services South Australia; Department of Human Services Victoria; Diabetes Australia; Diabetes Australia Northern Territory; Eli Lilly Australia; Estate of the Late Edward Wilson; GlaxoSmith-Kline; Highpoint Shopping Centre; Jack Brockhoff Foundation; Janssen-Cilag; Kidney Health Australia; Marian & EH Flack Trust; Menzies Research Institute; Merck Sharp & Dohme; Multiplex; Novartis Pharmaceuticals; Novo Nordisk Pharmaceuticals; Pfizer Pty Ltd; Pratt Foundation; Queensland Health; Roche Diagnostics Australia; Royal Prince Alfred Hospital Sydney; and Sanofi-Synthelabo.