Journal article

Incompatible and sterile insect techniques combined eliminate mosquitoes

Xiaoying Zheng, Dongjing Zhang, Yongjun Li, Cui Yang, Yu Wu, Xiao Liang, Yongkang Liang, Xiaoling Pan, Linchao Hu, Qiang Sun, Xiaohua Wang, Yingyang Wei, Jian Zhu, Wei Qian, Ziqiang Yan, Andrew G Parker, Jeremie RL Gilles, Kostas Bourtzis, Jeremy Bouyer, Moxun Tang Show all

Nature | NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP | Published : 2019

Abstract

The radiation-based sterile insect technique (SIT) has successfully suppressed field populations of several insect pest species, but its effect on mosquito vector control has been limited. The related incompatible insect technique (IIT)-which uses sterilization caused by the maternally inherited endosymbiotic bacteria Wolbachia-is a promising alternative, but can be undermined by accidental release of females infected with the same Wolbachia strain as the released males. Here we show that combining incompatible and sterile insect techniques (IIT-SIT) enables near elimination of field populations of the world's most invasive mosquito species, Aedes albopictus. Millions of factory-reared adult..

View full abstract

University of Melbourne Researchers

Grants

Awarded by Guangdong Innovative Research Team Program


Awarded by Scientific and Technological Leading Talents of Guangzhou Development District


Awarded by Science and Technology Planning Project of Guangdong Province


Awarded by IAEA Department of Technical Cooperation


Awarded by 111 Project


Awarded by Key Project of NNSF of China


Awarded by China Postdoctoral Innovation Program


Awarded by NJAU-MSU Asia-Hub Project


Funding Acknowledgements

This work was supported by Guangdong Innovative Research Team Program (No. 2011S009), Scientific and Technological Leading Talents of Guangzhou Development District (No. 2013L-P116), Science and Technology Planning Project of Guangdong Province (2016A020251001), a grant from the Foundation for the NIH through the Grand Challenges in Global Health Initiative of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, the joint Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO) of the United Nations and International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture and the IAEA Department of Technical Cooperation (RAS5066, RAS5082, D42016 and D44002), the 111 Project (grant no. B12003), Key Project of NNSF of China (11631005), China Postdoctoral Innovation Program (BX20180394), and a grant-in-aid for joint research (2017-AH-04) from the NJAU-MSU Asia-Hub Project. A.A.H. was supported by an NHMRC Fellowship. We thank X. Zhou, S. O'Neill, S. L. Dobson, G. Bian and E. Walker for their support, suggestions and technical assistance.