Journal article

Evidence for a sex-specific contribution of polygenic load for anorexia nervosa to body weight and prefrontal brain structure in nonclinical individuals

Elisabeth J Leehr, Nils Opel, Janina Werner, Ronny Redlich, Jonathan Repple, Dominik Grotegerd, Katharina Dohm, Janik Goltermann, Joscha Boehnlein, Azmeraw T Amare, Lisa Sindermann, Katharina Foerster, Susanne Meinert, Verena Enneking, Maike Richter, Tim Hahn, Bernhard T Baune, Udo Dannlowski

Neuropsychopharmacology | NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP | Published : 2019

Abstract

Genetic predisposition and brain structural abnormalities have been shown to be involved in the biological underpinnings of anorexia nervosa (AN). Prefrontal brain regions are suggested to contribute through behavioral inhibition mechanisms to body weight. However, it is unknown if and to which extent biological correlates for AN might be present in individuals without clinical AN symptomatology. We therefore investigated the contribution of polygenic load for AN on body weight and prefrontal brain structure in a sample of n = 380 nonclinical individuals. A polygenic score (PGS) reflecting the individual genetic load for the trait of anorexia nervosa was calculated. Structural MRI data were ..

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Grants

Awarded by German Research Foundation (DFG)


Awarded by Interdisciplinary Center for Clinical Research (IZKF) of the medical faculty of Munster


Funding Acknowledgements

This work was funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG, grant FOR2107 DA1151/5-1 and DA1151/5-2 to UD; SFB-TRR58, Projects C09 and Z02 to UD) and the Interdisciplinary Center for Clinical Research (IZKF) of the medical faculty of Munster (grant Dan3/012/17 to UD grant SEED 11/18 to NO) and the Deanery of the Medical Faculty of the University of Munster. All authors state that they have no actual or potential conflict of interest to declare, including any financial, personal, or other relationships with other people or organizations within 3 years of beginning the submitted work that could influence or bias their work.