Journal article

Asynchronous generation of oil droplets using a microfluidic flow focusing system

Peter Thurgood, Sara Baratchi, Aram Arash, Elena Pirogova, Aaron R Jex, Khashayar Khoshmanesh

Scientific Reports | NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP | Published : 2019

Abstract

Here, we show that long-term exposure of PDMS based microfluidic droplet generation systems to water can reverse their characteristics such that they generate oil-in-water droplets instead of water-in-oil droplets. The competition between two oil columns entering via the two side channels leads to asynchronous generation of oil droplets. We identify various modes of droplet generation, and study the size, gap and generation rate of droplets under different combinations of oil and water pressures. Oil droplets can also be generated using syringe pumps, various oil viscosities, and different combinations of immiscible liquids. We also demonstrate the ability to dynamically change the gap betwe..

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University of Melbourne Researchers

Grants

Awarded by Australian National Health and Medical Research Council


Awarded by Australian National Health and Medical Research Foundation Career Development Fellowship program


Awarded by Australian Research Council


Funding Acknowledgements

The authors wish to acknowledge RMIT's MicroNano Research Facility (MNRF) for fabrication of microfluidic devices. S. B. acknowledges the Australian Research Council for Discovery for Early Career Researchers Award (DE170100239). E. P. acknowledges the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council for funding 'The Australian Centre for Electromagnetic Bioeffects Research' (NHMRC CRE APP1135076). A. R. J. acknowledges the Australian National Health and Medical Research Foundation Career Development Fellowship program (APP1126395). A. R. J. also acknowledges funding from the Victorian State Government Operational Infrastructure Support and Australian Government National Health and Medical Research Council Independent Research Institute Infrastructure Support Scheme. A. R. J. and K. K. acknowledge the Australian Research Council for Discovery Grant (DP180102049). K. K. also acknowledges the Australian Research Council for Discovery Grant (DP170102138).