Journal article

Early mobilization and quality of life after stroke Findings from AVERT

Toby B Cumming, Leonid Churilov, Janice Collier, Geoffrey Donnan, Fiona Ellery, Helen Dewey, Peter Langhorne, Richard Lindley, Marj Moodie, Amanda G Thrift, Julie Bernhardt, E Hibbert, R Melling, S Petrolo, T Purvis, H Williamson, P Adams, L Augoustakis, S Batcheler, S Berney Show all

Neurology | LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS | Published : 2019

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To determine whether early and more frequent mobilization after stroke affects health-related quality of life. METHODS: A Very Early Rehabilitation Trial (AVERT) was an international, multicenter (56 sites), phase 3 randomized controlled trial, spanning 2006-2015. People were included if they were aged ≥18 years, presented within 24 hours of a first or recurrent stroke (ischemic or hemorrhagic), and satisfied preordained physiologic criteria. Participants were randomized to usual care alone or very early and more frequent mobilization in addition to usual care. Quality of life at 12 months was a prespecified secondary outcome, evaluated using the Assessment of Quality of Life 4D (..

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Grants

Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) of Australia


Awarded by Chest Heart and Stroke Scotland


Awarded by Northern Ireland Chest Heart and Stroke, Singapore Health


Awarded by UK Stroke Association


Awarded by UK National Institute of Health Research


Awarded by NHMRC


Awarded by Australia Research Council


Funding Acknowledgements

The trial was initially supported by the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) of Australia (grants 386201, 1041401). Additional funding was received from Chest Heart and Stroke Scotland (Res08/A114), Northern Ireland Chest Heart and Stroke, Singapore Health (SHF/FG401P/2008), the UK Stroke Association (TSA2009/09), and the UK National Institute of Health Research (HTA Project 12/01/16). NHMRC fellowship funding was provided to A.G.T. (1042600), H.D. (336102), and J.B. (1058635). J.B. also received fellowship funding from the Australia Research Council (0991086) and the National Heart Foundation.