Journal article

Transdiagnostic variations in impulsivity and compulsivity in obsessive-compulsive disorder and gambling disorder correlate with effective connectivity in cortical-striatal-thalamic-cortical circuits

Linden Parkes, Jeggan Tiego, Kevin Aquino, Leah Braganza, Samuel R Chamberlain, Leonardo F Fontenelle, Ben J Harrison, Valentina Lorenzetti, Bryan Paton, Adeel Razi, Alex Fornito, Murat Yucel

NeuroImage | ACADEMIC PRESS INC ELSEVIER SCIENCE | Published : 2019

Abstract

Individual differences in impulsivity and compulsivity is thought to underlie vulnerability to a broad range of disorders and are closely tied to cortical-striatal-thalamic-cortical function. However, whether impulsivity and compulsivity in clinical disorders is continuous with the healthy population and explains cortical-striatal-thalamic-cortical dysfunction across different disorders remains unclear. Here, we characterized the relationship between cortical-striatal-thalamic-cortical effective connectivity, estimated using dynamic causal modelling of resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging data, and dimensional phenotypes of impulsivity and compulsivity in two symptomatically d..

View full abstract

University of Melbourne Researchers

Grants

Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council


Awarded by Australian Research Council


Funding Acknowledgements

We sincerely thank Dr. Ben Fulcher for his input in early phases of project planning and development of ideas. L.P. was supported by an Australian Postgraduate Award. J.T. was supported by National Health and Medical Research Council (ID:1002458, 1046054). A.F. was supported by the Charles and Sylvia Viertel Foundation, the Australian Research Council (ID: FT130100589) and the National Health and Medical Research Council (ID: 3251213, 3251250, 3251392). M.Y. was supported by a National Health and Medical Research Council Fellowship (ID: 1117188), Monash University and the David Winston Turner Endowment Fund. B.H was supported by a National Health and Medical Research Council Fellowship (ID: 1124472). A.R. was funded by Australian Research Council DECRA Fellowship (Ref: DE170100128) and the Wellcome Trust.