Journal article

Strip and Cka negatively regulate JNK signalling during Drosophila spermatogenesis

John E La Marca, Sarah T Diepstraten, Amy L Hodge, Hongyan Wang, Adam H Hart, Helena E Richardson, W Gregory Somers

Development | COMPANY BIOLOGISTS LTD | Published : 2019

Abstract

One fundamental property of a stem cell niche is the exchange of molecular signals between its component cells. Niche models, such as the Drosophila melanogaster testis, have been instrumental in identifying and studying the conserved genetic factors that contribute to niche molecular signalling. Here, we identify jam packed (jam), an allele of Striatin interacting protein (Strip), which is a core member of the highly conserved Striatin-interacting phosphatase and kinase (STRIPAK) complex. In the developing Drosophila testis, Strip cell-autonomously regulates the differentiation and morphology of the somatic lineage, and non-cell-autonomously regulates the proliferation and differentiation o..

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Grants

Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council


Awarded by Australian Research Council


Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council fellowship


Awarded by Singapore National Medical Research Council


Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council Peter Doherty Australian Biomedical Fellowship


Funding Acknowledgements

OzDros is supported by a National Health and Medical Research Council enabling grant (418033). J.E.L.M. was supported by a La Trobe University David Myers scholarship and an Australian Research Council Discovery grant (DP170102549 to H.E.R.). S.T.D. was supported by a La Trobe University Postgraduate Research Scholarship. H.E.R. was supported by a National Health and Medical Research Council fellowship (1020056) and funds from the La Trobe Institute for Molecular Science and La Trobe University. H.W. was supported by the Singapore National Medical Research Council (NMRC/CBRG/0082/2015). W.G.S. was supported by a National Health and Medical Research Council Peter Doherty Australian Biomedical Fellowship (520307). A.H.H. was supported by a National Health and Medical Research Council grant (GNT0606691).