Journal article

Loss of Independence After Operative Management of Femoral Neck Fractures

Emil H Schemitsch, Sheila Sprague, Martin J Heetveld, Sofia Bzovsky, Diane Heels-Ansdell, Qi Zhou, Marc Swiontkowski, Mohit Bhandari, M Bhandari, M Swiontkowski, PJ Devereaux, Gordon Guyatt, MJ Heetveld, Kyle Jeray, Susan Liew, Martin Richardson, EH Schemitsch, Lehana Thabane, Paul Tornetta, Stephen D Walter Show all

JOURNAL OF ORTHOPAEDIC TRAUMA | LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS | Published : 2019

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: The FAITH trial evaluated effects of sliding hip screws versus cancellous screws in femoral neck fracture patients. Using FAITH trial data, we quantified changes in living status, use of aids, and investigated factors associated with living and walking independently 12 months after fracture. METHODS: We conducted a descriptive analysis to quantify patients' changes in living status, use of aids, and used multivariable Cox regression analyses to determine factors associated with living and walking independently after fracture. RESULTS: Of patients who lived independently before hip fracture, 3.07% (50-80 years old) and 19.81% (>80 years old) were institutionalized 12 months after ..

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Grants

Awarded by Canadian Institutes of Health Research


Awarded by National Institutes of Health


Awarded by Stichting NutsOhra


Awarded by Netherlands Organization for Health Research and Development


Funding Acknowledgements

The FAITH study was supported by research grants from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (MOP-106630 and MCT-87771), the National Institutes of Health (1R01AR055267-01A1), Stichting NutsOhra (SNO-T-0602-43), the Netherlands Organization for Health Research and Development (80-82310-97-11032), and Physicians' Services Incorporated.E. H. Schemitsch reports personal fees from Stryker, personal fees from Smith & Nephew, personal fees from Zimmer, personal fees from Acumed, personal fees from Amgen, personal fees from Sanofi, and personal fees from Pendopharm, outside the submitted work. S. Sprague reports employment/salary from McMaster University, and other from the Global Research Solutions, outside the submitted work. M. J. Heetveld reports grants from Stichting NutsOhra, grants from the Netherlands Organization for Health Research and Development, during the conduct of the study. M. Swiontkowski reports grants from the National Institutes of Health (NIH)/National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS), during the conduct of the study; other from JBJS Editor, outside the submitted work. M. Bhandari reports grants from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, grants from the National Institutes of Health, grants from Stichting NutsOhra, grants from the Netherlands Organization for Health Research and Development, grants from Physicians' Services Incorporated, and grants from Stryker Inc, during the conduct of the study; grants and personal fees from Stryker Inc, personal fees from Smith & Nephew, grants and personal fees from Amgen, grants from DePuy, grants and personal fees from Eli Lilly, grants and personal fees from DJO Global Inc, personal fees from Zimmer, personal fees from Ferring, and grants from the Canada Research Chair in Musculoskeletal Trauma, outside the submitted work. The remaining authors have no conflicts of interest.