Journal article

Cytokine release and gastrointestinal symptoms after gluten challenge in celiac disease

Gautam Goel, Jason A Tye-Din, Shuo-Wang Qiao, Amy K Russell, Toufic Mayassi, Cezary Ciszewski, Vikas K Sarna, Suyue Wang, Kaela E Goldstein, John L Dzuris, Leslie J Williams, Ramnik J Xavier, Knut EA Lundin, Bana Jabri, Ludvig M Sollid, Robert P Anderson

Science Advances | AMER ASSOC ADVANCEMENT SCIENCE | Published : 2019

Abstract

Celiac disease (CeD), caused by immune reactions to cereal gluten, is treated with gluten -elimination diets. Within hours of gluten exposure, either perorally or extraorally by intradermal injection, treated patients experience gastrointestinal symptoms. To test whether gluten exposure leads to systemic cytokine production time -related to symptoms, series of multiplex cytokine measurements were obtained in CeD patients after gluten challenge. Peptide injection elevated at least 15 plasma cytokines, with IL-2, IL-8, and IL-10 being most prominent (fold-change increase at 4 hours of 272, 11, and 1.2, respectively). IL-2 and IL-8 were the only cytokines elevated at 2 hours, preceding onset of..

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University of Melbourne Researchers

Grants

Awarded by Research Council of Norway (through its Centre of Excellence funding scheme)


Awarded by South-Eastern Norway Regional Health Authority


Awarded by Stiftelsen KG Jebsen


Awarded by U.S. NIH


Awarded by Digestive Diseases Research Core Center at the University of Chicago


Awarded by NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF ALLERGY AND INFECTIOUS DISEASES


Awarded by NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF DIABETES AND DIGESTIVE AND KIDNEY DISEASES


Funding Acknowledgements

G.G. and R.J.X. were supported by The Paul and Kathy Severino Research Fund. S.-W.Q., K.E.A.L., and L.M.S. were supported by the Research Council of Norway (grant 179573/V40 through its Centre of Excellence funding scheme), the South-Eastern Norway Regional Health Authority (grant 2013046), and the Stiftelsen KG Jebsen (SKGH-MED-017). B.J. and T.M. were supported by grants from the Digestive Diseases Research Core Center (DK42086) at the University of Chicago and from the U.S. NIH (RO1DK67180 and R01DK098435 to B.J.). J.A.T.-D. was supported by the Mathison Centenary Fellowship, University of Melbourne.