Journal article

HLA Alleles Associated With Risk of Ankylosing Spondylitis and Rheumatoid Arthritis Influence the Gut Microbiome

Mark Asquith, Peter R Sternes, Mary-Ellen Costello, Lisa Karstens, Sarah Diamond, Tammy M Martin, Zhixiu Li, Mhairi S Marshall, Timothy D Spector, Le Cao Kim-Anh, James T Rosenbaum, Matthew A Brown

ARTHRITIS & RHEUMATOLOGY | WILEY | Published : 2019

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: HLA alleles affect susceptibility to more than 100 diseases, but the mechanisms that account for these genotype-disease associations are largely unknown. HLA alleles strongly influence predisposition to ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Both AS and RA patients have discrete intestinal and fecal microbiome signatures. Whether these changes are the cause or consequence of the diseases themselves is unclear. To distinguish these possibilities, we examined the effect of HLA-B27 and HLA-DRB1 RA risk alleles on the composition of the intestinal microbiome in healthy individuals. METHODS: Five hundred sixty-eight stool and biopsy samples from 6 intestinal sites w..

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University of Melbourne Researchers

Grants

Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council Australia


Awarded by NIHR


Awarded by NIH


Awarded by NIH (Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development)


Awarded by EUNICE KENNEDY SHRIVER NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF CHILD HEALTH & HUMAN DEVELOPMENT


Awarded by NATIONAL EYE INSTITUTE


Funding Acknowledgements

Supported by the National Health and Medical Research Council Australia (grant APP1065509). TwinsUK was supported by the Wellcome Trust, Medical Research Council, Chronic Disease Research Foundation, Arthritis Research UK, European Union, and the NIHR-funded Clinical Research Facility and Biomedical Research Centre at Guy's and St. Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust and King's College London (grant WT081878MA). Drs. Asquith and Rosenbaum's work was supported by the Spondylitis Association of America, the Rheumatology Research Foundation, and the NIH (grant R01-EY-029266). Dr. Karstens' work was supported by the NIH (Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development award K12-HD-043488). Dr. Spector's work was supported by the NIHR (Senior Investigator Fellowship). Dr. Rosenbaum's work was supported by the OHSU Foundation (Collins Medical Trust), the William and Mary Bauman Foundation, the Stan and Madelle Family Trust, and Research to Prevent Blindness. Dr. Brown's work was supported by the National Health and Medical Research Council Australia (Senior Principal Research Fellowship).