Journal article

MRtrix3: A fast, flexible and open software framework for medical image processing and visualisation

J-Donald Tournier, Robert Smith, David Raffelt, Rami Tabbara, Thijs Dhollander, Maximilian Pietsch, Daan Christiaens, Ben Jeurissen, Chun-Hung Yeh, Alan Connelly

NeuroImage | ACADEMIC PRESS INC ELSEVIER SCIENCE | Published : 2019

Abstract

MRtrix3 is an open-source, cross-platform software package for medical image processing, analysis and visualisation, with a particular emphasis on the investigation of the brain using diffusion MRI. It is implemented using a fast, modular and flexible general-purpose code framework for image data access and manipulation, enabling efficient development of new applications, whilst retaining high computational performance and a consistent command-line interface between applications. In this article, we provide a high-level overview of the features of the MRtrix3 framework and general-purpose image processing applications provided with the software.

Grants

Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) of Australia


Awarded by European Research Council under the European Union


Awarded by Wellcome/EPSRC Centre for Medical Engineering at King's College London


Awarded by Medical Research Council


Awarded by Research Foundation Flanders (FWO Vlaanderen)


Funding Acknowledgements

This work was primarily supported by the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) of Australia (Program Grants 400121, 628952, 1091593; AC research fellowship 1026077). We are additionally grateful to the Victorian Government's Operational Infrastructure Support Program for their support.This work also received funding from the European Research Council under the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013/ERC grant agreement no. [319456] dHCP project), and was supported by the Wellcome/EPSRC Centre for Medical Engineering at King's College London [WT 203148/Z/16/Z]; the Medical Research Council [MR/K006355/1] and by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Biomedical Research Centre based at Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust and King's College London. The views expressed are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of the NHS, the NIHR or the Department of Health.RS is recently supported by fellowship funding from the National Imaging Facility (NIF), an Australian Government National Collaborative Research Infrastructure Strategy (NCRIS) capability.BJ is a postdoctoral fellow of the Research Foundation Flanders (FWO Vlaanderen), Grant no. 12M3116N & 12M3119N.