Journal article

The role of haptoglobin and hemopexin in the prevention of delayed cerebral ischaemia after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage: a review of current literature

Sean Griffiths, Jeremy Clark, Alexios A Adamides, James Ziogas

NEUROSURGICAL REVIEW | SPRINGER | Published : 2020

Abstract

Delayed cerebral ischaemia (DCI) after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (aSAH) is a major cause of mortality and morbidity. The pathophysiology of DCI after aSAH is thought to involve toxic mediators released from lysis of red blood cells within the subarachnoid space, including free haemoglobin and haem. Haptoglobin and hemopexin are endogenously produced acute phase proteins that are involved in the clearance of these toxic mediators. The aim of this review is to investigate the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in DCI and the role of both endogenous as well as exogenously administered haptoglobin and hemopexin in the prevention of DCI.