Journal article

Effects of a 12-Month Supervised, Community-Based, Multimodal Exercise Program Followed by a 6-Month Research-to-Practice Transition on Bone Mineral Density, Trabecular Microarchitecture, and Physical Function in Older Adults: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Robin M Daly, Jenny Gianoudis, Mariana E Kersh, Christine A Bailey, Peter R Ebeling, Roland Krug, Caryl A Nowson, Keith Hill, Kerrie M Sanders

Journal of Bone and Mineral Research | WILEY | Published : 2019

Abstract

Multicomponent exercise programs are recommended to reduce fracture risk; however, their effectiveness in real-world community settings remain uncertain. This 18-month randomized controlled trial investigated the effects of a 12-month, community-based, supervised multicomponent exercise program followed by a 6-month "research-to-practice" transition on areal bone mineral density (BMD), trabecular bone microarchitecture, functional performance, and falls in older adults at increased fracture risk. One-hundred and sixty-two adults aged ≥60 years with osteopenia or at increased falls risk were randomized to the Osteo-cise: Strong Bones for Life multicomponent exercise program (n = 81) or a cont..

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University of Melbourne Researchers

Grants

Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Career Development Award


Funding Acknowledgements

Funding for this study was provided by a grant from the JO & JR Wicking Trust, which is managed by ANZ Trustees. This study was under the auspices of Osteoporosis Australia and the Australian and New Zealand Bone and Mineral Society (ANZBMS), which are charitable organizations that provide grants for health and medical research. RMD was supported by a National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Career Development Award (ID 425849). We thank the following for their support of the project: Arthritis Victoria, YMCA Victoria, Belgravia Leisure, Brimbank, and Maribyrnong City Councils. We also thank Blackmores for provided the calcium and vitamin D3 supplements used in this study and all the participants and exercise trainers who were involved in the study.