Journal article

SToP (See, Treat, Prevent) skin sores and scabies trial: study protocol for a cluster randomised, stepped-wedge trial for skin disease control in remote Western Australia

Marianne J Mullane, Timothy C Barnett, Jeffrey W Cannon, Jonathan R Carapetis, Ray Christophers, Juli Coffin, Mark A Jones, Julie A Marsh, Frieda Mc Loughlin, Vicki O'Donnell, Rebecca Pavlos, Bec Smith, Andrew C Steer, Steven YC Tong, Roz Walker, Asha C Bowen

BMJ OPEN | BMJ PUBLISHING GROUP | Published : 2019

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Skin is important in Australian Aboriginal culture informing kinship and identity. In many remote Aboriginal communities, scabies and impetigo are very common. Untreated skin infections are painful, itchy and frequently go untreated due to under-recognition and lack of awareness of their potential serious complications. We hypothesise that the skin infection burden in remote Aboriginal communities can be reduced by implementing streamlined training and treatment pathways integrated with environmental health and health promotion activities, tested in the See, Treat, Prevent (SToP skin sores and scabies) trial. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: SToP will evaluate a skin control programme usi..

View full abstract

Grants

Awarded by Western Australia Department of Health Future Health WA Third Year Initiative: Kimberley Healthy Skin Program


Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC)


Awarded by NHMRC


Funding Acknowledgements

This study is funded by the Western Australia Department of Health Future Health WA Third Year Initiative: Kimberley Healthy Skin Program (FHWAYR3-2015/16-KHS) and the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Project Funding (GNT1128950). AB and SYCT are supported by NHMRC fellowships (1088735 and 1145033). TCB is supported by a Career Development Fellowship from the NHMRC-funded `Improving Health Outcomes in the Tropical North: A multidisciplinary collaboration' (Hot North; APP1131932).