Journal article

Widespread cis-regulatory convergence between the extinct Tasmanian tiger and gray wolf

Charles Y Feigin, Axel H Newton, Andrew J Pask

GENOME RESEARCH | COLD SPRING HARBOR LAB PRESS, PUBLICATIONS DEPT | Published : 2019

Abstract

The extinct marsupial Tasmanian tiger, or thylacine, and the eutherian gray wolf are among the most widely recognized examples of convergent evolution in mammals. Despite being distantly related, these large predators independently evolved extremely similar craniofacial morphologies, and evidence suggests that they filled similar ecological niches. Previous analyses revealed little evidence of adaptive convergence between their protein-coding genes. Thus, the genetic basis of their convergence is still unclear. Here, we identified candidate craniofacial cis-regulatory elements across vertebrates and compared their evolutionary rates in the thylacine and wolf, revealing abundant signatures of..

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Grants

Awarded by Australian Research Council


Funding Acknowledgements

We thank Katie Pollard of the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics at UCSF for providing advice into evolutionary analyses performed in this paper; Ricardo Mallarino of the Department of Molecular Biology at Princeton University for editorial advice; Bernard Meade from the National eResearch Collaboration Tools and Resources project for providing computational resources; MacNeil Lyons for the use of his wolf photograph (Fig. 1B); and Elise Ireland for proofreading. A.J.P. was supported by an Australian Research Council future fellowship (FT140100964).