Journal article

beta-glucan-dependent shuttling of conidia from neutrophils to macrophages occurs during fungal infection establishment

Vahid Pazhakh, Felix Ellett, Ben A Croker, Joanne A O'Donnell, Luke Pase, Keith E Schulze, R Stefan Greulich, Aakash Gupta, Constantino Carlos Reyes-Aldasoro, Alex Andrianopoulos, Graham J Lieschke

PLOS BIOLOGY | PUBLIC LIBRARY SCIENCE | Published : 2019

Abstract

The initial host response to fungal pathogen invasion is critical to infection establishment and outcome. However, the diversity of leukocyte-pathogen interactions is only recently being appreciated. We describe a new form of interleukocyte conidial exchange called "shuttling." In Talaromyces marneffei and Aspergillus fumigatus zebrafish in vivo infections, live imaging demonstrated conidia initially phagocytosed by neutrophils were transferred to macrophages. Shuttling is unidirectional, not a chance event, and involves alterations of phagocyte mobility, intercellular tethering, and phagosome transfer. Shuttling kinetics were fungal-species-specific, implicating a fungal determinant. β-gluc..

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University of Melbourne Researchers

Grants

Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council


Awarded by Australian Research Council


Awarded by National Institutes of Health


Awarded by Massachusetts General Hospital BioMEMS Center (National Institutes of Health)


Awarded by BCH IDDRC


Awarded by NATIONAL HEART, LUNG, AND BLOOD INSTITUTE


Funding Acknowledgements

The work was supported by the National Health and Medical Research Council to GL and AA (461208, 637394, 1044754, 1069284), the National Health and Medical Research Council to BC (637367), Australian Research Council to BC (DP1094854), National Institutes of Health to BC (5R01HL124209), an Australian Postgraduate Award to FE and LP, and a Walter and Eliza Hall Institute Edith Moffatt Scholarship to FE and LP. FE was supported by a Monash University Bridging Postdoctoral Fellowship, and while working on writing this manuscript while in the laboratory of Dr D. Irimia, he was supported by the Massachusetts General Hospital BioMEMS Center (National Institutes of Health Grant EB002503). VP was funded by a Monash Graduate Scholarship, a Monash International Postgraduate Research Fellowship and a Monash Postgraduate Publication Award. A Dora Lush Scholarship (National Health and Medical Research Council) supported JO. Imaging performed in Boston Children's Hospital Intellectual Developmental Disabilities Research Center is supported by grant BCH IDDRC, 1U54HD0902565. The University of California San Diego Neuroscience Microscopy Imaging Core is supported by National Institutes of Health grant NS047101. The Australian Regenerative Medicine Institute is supported by grants from the State Government of Victoria and the Australian Government. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.