Journal article

DNA methylation-based biological age, genome-wide average DNA methylation, and conventional breast cancer risk factors

Minyuan Chen, Ee Ming Wong, Tuong L Nguyen, Gillian S Dite, Jennifer Stone, Pierre-Antoine Dugue, Graham G Giles, Melissa C Southey, Roger L Milne, John L Hopper, Shuai Li

SCIENTIFIC REPORTS | NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP | Published : 2019

Abstract

DNA methylation-based biological age (DNAm age), as well as genome-wide average DNA methylation, have been reported to predict breast cancer risk. We aimed to investigate the associations between these DNA methylation-based risk factors and 18 conventional breast cancer risk factors for disease-free women. A sample of 479 individuals from the Australian Mammographic Density Twins and Sisters was used for discovery, a sample of 3354 individuals from the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study was used for replication, and meta-analyses pooling results from the two studies were conducted. DNAm age based on three epigenetic clocks (Hannum, Horvath and Levine) and genome-wide average DNA methylatio..

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Grants

Awarded by Centre of Research Excellence Grant from the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC)


Awarded by NHMRC


Awarded by National Breast Cancer Foundation


Awarded by Australian National Health and Medical Research Council


Funding Acknowledgements

We thank all women who participated in this study. This research was facilitated through access to Twins Research Australia, a national resource supported by a Centre of Research Excellence Grant (ID: 1079102) from the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC). The Australian Mammographic Density Twins and Sisters Study is supported by the NHMRC (grant numbers 1050561 and 1079102), Cancer Australia and National Breast Cancer Foundation (grant number 509307). MCS is a NHMRC Senior Research Fellow (APP1155163). JLH is a Redmond Barry Professorial Fellow and a NHMRC Senior Principal Research Fellow. TLN and SL are Cancer Council Victoria Postdoctoral Research Fellows. The Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study cohort recruitment was funded by VicHealth and Cancer Council Victoria. The cohort was further augmented by Australian National Health and Medical Research Council grants number 209057, 396414 and 1074383 and by infrastructure provided by Cancer Council Victoria. Additional support was received from the NHMRC project grant numbers 1011618, 1026892, 1027505, 1050198, and 1043616, and the Victorian Breast Cancer Research Consortium (PI Southey).