Journal article

Improving Mood with Physical ACTivity (IMPACT) trial: a cluster randomised controlled trial to determine the effectiveness of a brief physical activity behaviour change intervention on depressive symptoms in young people, compared with psychoeducation, in addition to routine clinical care within youth mental health services - a protocol study

Alexandra G Parker, Connie Markulev, Debra J Rickwood, Andrew Mackinnon, Rosemary Purcell, Mario Alvarez-Jimenez, Alison R Yung, Patrick McGorry, Sarah E Hetrick, Anthony Jorm

BMJ Open | BMJ PUBLISHING GROUP | Published : 2019

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Depression is highly prevalent and the leading contributor to the burden of disease in young people worldwide, making it an ongoing priority for early intervention. As the current evidence-based interventions of medication and psychological therapy are only modestly effective, there is an urgent need for additional treatment strategies. This paper describes the rationale of the Improving Mood with Physical ACTivity (IMPACT) trial. The primary aim of the IMPACT trial is to determine the effectiveness of a physical activity intervention compared with psychoeducation, in addition to routine clinical care, on depressive symptoms in young people. Additional aims are to evaluate the ..

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Grants

Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC)


Awarded by NHMRC


Funding Acknowledgements

This work was supported by a National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Project Grant (GNT1063033) titled 'Physical activity for young people with depression: A cluster randomised controlled trial to test the effectiveness of incorporating a brief intervention into routine clinical care'. AJ received salary support from an NHMRC Senior Principal Research Fellowship (APP1059785). AY received salary support from an NHMRC Principal Research Fellowship (APP1136829). Study sponsor: the study is sponsored by the Sponsor Operations Department, Orygen, The National Centre of Excellence in Youth Mental Health. Contact details: 35 Poplar Road, Parkville, Victoria, Australia 3052. A risk assessment of the study conducted by the study sponsor determined that a data monitoring committee was not needed due to the low-risk nature of the intervention.