Journal article

IL-23 costimulates antigen-specific MAIT cell activation and enables vaccination against bacterial infection

Huimeng Wang, Lars Kjer-Nielsen, Mai Shi, Criselle D'Souza, Troi J Pediongco, Hanwei Cao, Lyudmila Kostenko, Xin Yi Lim, Sidonia BG Eckle, Bronwyn S Meehan, Tianyuan Zhu, Bingjie Wang, Zhe Zhao, Jeffrey YW Mak, David P Fairlie, Michele WL Teng, Jamie Rossjohn, Di Yu, Barbara Fazekas de St Groth, George Lovrecz Show all

Science Immunology | AMER ASSOC ADVANCEMENT SCIENCE | Published : 2019

Abstract

Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells are activated in a TCR-dependent manner by antigens derived from the riboflavin synthesis pathway, including 5-(2-oxopropylideneamino)-6-d-ribitylaminouracil (5-OP-RU), bound to MHC-related protein-1 (MR1). However, MAIT cell activation in vivo has not been studied in detail. Here, we have found and characterized additional molecular signals required for optimal activation and expansion of MAIT cells after pulmonary Legionella or Salmonella infection in mice. We show that either bone marrow-derived APCs or non-bone marrow-derived cells can activate MAIT cells in vivo, depending on the pathogen. Optimal MAIT cell activation in vivo requires signalin..

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Grants

Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia


Awarded by Australian Research Council


Awarded by ARC Future Fellowship


Awarded by NHMRC Senior Principal Research Fellowship


Awarded by ARC Australian Laureate Fellowship


Funding Acknowledgements

We acknowledge the support of the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia (program grants 1113293 and 1092262 and project grant 1120467) and the Australian Research Council (Discovery Project DP170104321). A.J.C. was supported by an ARC Future Fellowship FT160100083. D.P.F. was supported by an NHMRC Senior Principal Research Fellowship 1117017. J.R. was supported by an ARC Australian Laureate Fellowship FT160100049. H.W. was supported by a Melbourne International Engagement Award (The University of Melbourne). C.D. was supported by a Melbourne International Research Scholarship and a Melbourne International Fee Remission Scholarship (The University of Melbourne).