Journal article

Childhood pneumonia, pleurisy and lung function: a cohort study from the first to sixth decade of life

Jennifer L Perret, Caroline J Lodge, Adrian J Lowe, David P Johns, Bruce R Thompson, Dinh S Bui, Lyle C Gurrin, Melanie C Matheson, Christine F McDonald, Richard Wood-Baker, Cecilie Svanes, Paul S Thomas, Graham G Giles, Anne B Chang, Michael J Abramson, E Haydn Walters, Shyamali C Dharmage, Heather Gibson, Bryan Gandevia, Harold Silverstone Show all

Thorax | BMJ PUBLISHING GROUP | Published : 2020

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Adult spirometry following community-acquired childhood pneumonia has variably been reported as showing obstructive or non-obstructive deficits. We analysed associations between doctor-diagnosed childhood pneumonia/pleurisy and more comprehensive lung function in a middle-aged general population cohort born in 1961. METHODS: Data were from the prospective population-based Tasmanian Longitudinal Health Study cohort. Analysed lung function was from ages 7 years (prebronchodilator spirometry only, n=7097), 45 years (postbronchodilator spirometry, carbon monoxide transfer factor and static lung volumes, n=1220) and 53 years (postbronchodilator spirometry and transfer factor, n=2485..

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Grants

Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) of Australia


Awarded by NHMRC


Awarded by Children's Hospital Foundation (Queensland)


Funding Acknowledgements

This study was supported by the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) of Australia (research grants 299901 and 1021275); the University of Melbourne; Clifford Craig Foundation; the Victorian, Queensland and Tasmanian Asthma Foundations; Royal Hobart Hospital; Helen MacPherson Smith Trust; GlaxoSmithKline; and John L Hopper. JLP, CL, AL, EHW and SD are funded through the NHMRC of Australia. JLP was also in part supported by Lung Foundation Australia (LFA). ABC is funded by an NHMRC Practitioner Fellowship (APP1154302) and Children's Hospital Foundation (Queensland, grant 50286). The funding agencies had no direct role in the conduct of the study, the collection, management, statistical analysis and interpretation of the data, preparation, or approval of the manuscript.