Journal article

Handgrip Strength Is Associated With Hippocampal Volume and White Matter Hyperintensities in Major Depression and Healthy Controls: A UK Biobank Study

Josh A Firth, Lee Smith, Jerome Sarris, Davy Vancampfort, Felipe Schuch, Andre F Carvalho, Marco Solmi, Alison R Yung, Brendon Stubbs, Joseph Firth

Psychosomatic Medicine | LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS | Published : 2020

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Emerging evidence suggests that handgrip strength (a proxy for muscular fitness) is associated with better cognitive performance in people with major depressive disorder (MDD). The underlying processes are unclear, although hippocampal volume (HCV) reductions and white matter hyperintensities (WMHs) have been implicated. Therefore, we investigated the associations between handgrip strength and various brain region volumes and WMHs in MDD and healthy controls (HCs). METHODS: This study is a cross-sectional analysis of handgrip strength and neuroimaging data from the UK Biobank. Generalized linear models were used to assess the relationship between grip strength and gray matter, whi..

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Grants

Awarded by Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council Discovery Fellowship


Awarded by National Health and Medical Research Council Research Fellowship


Awarded by National Institute for Health Research (NIHR)/Health Education England Integrated Clinical Academic Programme Clinical Lectureship


Funding Acknowledgements

J.A.F. is supported by a Merton College Junior Research Fellowship and a Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council Discovery Fellowship (BB/S009752/1). J.S. is funded by an National Health and Medical Research Council Research Fellowship (APP1125000). B.S. is supported by Health Education England and the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR)/Health Education England Integrated Clinical Academic Programme Clinical Lectureship (ICA-CL-2017-03-001). B.S. is partly supported by the Maudsley Charity and the NIHR Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care South London at King's College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust. A.R.Y. is supported by an NIHR Senior Investigator award. The views expressed in this article are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the NHS, the NIHR, or the Department of Health and Social Care. J.F. is supported by a Blackmores Institute Fellowship. All authors report that they have no conflict of interest, and the present study received no funding.